Category Archives: Nutrition

Co-Therapies and Nutritional Supplements for Parkinson’s Disease

This year alone, 50,000 Americans will be diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease (PD). The number of cases in the US suffering with PD will be close to 1.0 million patients by 2020. This neurological disorder is second in total number of patients only to Alzheimer’s disease. What’s concerning our physicians the most is that the number of cases seems to be increasing. A report from the Mayo Clinic in March 2019, showed that the incidence of PD has increased significantly in the 30 years between 1976 to 2005 (1).

Neurologists serve in the front lines of the fight against PD, ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis) and Alzheimer’s. Their work load is increasing and sadly, the number of qualified neurologists available to take care of us is not keeping up with the increasing number of cases of these diseases.

The reality of Parkinson’s disease is upon us and the trend tells the full story. We can do nothing… or we can begin to take action now. If you fall into the latter group (and we hope that you do) we’ve got some good news.

Patient education and self-help efforts are increasing. New treatments and local support groups are emerging that help disseminate valuable information to help fight PD. Taking responsibility for your health is THE smartest strategy. Expecting that our health care system will be there for us and take care of us during a chronic disease is not a bet one should take. Take responsibility for your PD.

In the event that you’ve been diagnosed or are currently suffering with PD, what do you do now? Here’re some therapies and co-therapies that will help you fight PD.

  1. Make sure that you’re being treated by your Doctor or Neurologist

    Step one is to make sure that you get yourself the best professional care you can get. You can find a neurologist near you on WebMD.

  2. L-dopa (Levodopa) Supplementation for PD

    This is the go to drug for PD. It helps increase dopamine levels that cause many of the symptoms associated with PD. Although it’s not a cure, it helps keep symptoms under control during the early stages. Remember that L-dopa cannot reduce every PD symptom. Talk to your physician about this therapy.

  3. Nutritional Supplements for Parkinson’s Disease

    The Parkinson’s Foundation lists certain Nutritional Supplements, such as anti-oxidants and vitamins, as possible Over the Counter (OTC) and Complementary Therapies (4). These nutritional supplements for Parkinson’s disease show improvements in the reduction of certain symptoms of the disease. Among the more promising natural remedies for PD are:

    1. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10): also known as Ubiquinone, seems to play an important role in Mitochondrial health, the power center of our cells. A more concentrated form of Ubiquinone is Ubiquinol. This powerful neural booster is present in the AAKG+ product from Simplesa Nutrition. This supplement is most helpful in reducing tremors and muscle rigidity.
    2. Vitamins E and C: can fight damage in the brain and neurons caused by free radicals and may even lower the risk of getting PD in the first place. These vitamins are most helpful in reducing damage to your neurons.
    3. Glutathione: is known as one of the most powerful antioxidants available. A better absorbing form of Glutathione is called Liposomal Glutathione. Few supplements have received the level of positive comments from the scientific community that Glutathione has received. This supplement is most helpful in reducing oxidative damage to your organs and nervous system.
    4. Vitamin B-12: also known as Methylcobalamine is an important vitamin in nerve and brain health and may have a significant effect in protecting our memory. Vegetarians often have an acute Vitamin B-12 deficiency. Look for sublingual Liposomal B-12 for best absorption. This supplement is most helpful in helping your higher brain functions and in protecting your memory.
    5. Multi-Vitamin supplements: The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has put together a list of recommended nutritional supplements for Parkinson’s for daily use. Most of these vitamins and minerals and in the appropriate dosages for healthy adults are available in Total Health AM. This multi-vitamin and multi-mineral is most helpful in providing the necessary building blocks for a healthy body to help fight disease and repair damage.
  4. Diet and Exercise

    We know we keep hearing about it but Diet (Mediterranean Diet) and Exercise keeps the body healthy, your immune system robust and your renal and endocrine (detoxing) systems humming along. Stay with this winning strategy!

  5. Embrace a Spiritual Life

    If you’re religious, great! If you’re more of a free spirit, that’s ok too. At the very least spend time on the inside. Meditate, pray, breathe deeply, be mindful and be thankful. These simple co-therapies will help you cope with your PD and with the everyday challenges of life. As someone once said, “Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away…”.

So there you have it. PD will probably change your life but it’s not necessarily a death sentence. If you take responsibility for your PD, the progression will be slower, you will be in control, live a quality life and you will most likely increase the number of moments… that take your breath away.

Stay Strong!

Source:
1. Thelen, Gil. “A Parkinson’s ‘pandemic’ is coming and there aren’t enough doctors to deal with it.”, THE MIAMI HERALD, March 25th, 2019.
2. Parkinson’s Foundation, “New Study Shows 1.2 Million People in the United States Estimated to be Living with Parkinson’s Disease by 2030”, PARKINSON.ORG, July 10th 2018.
3. Mayo Clinic. “Parkinson’s disease”, MAYOCLINIC.ORG.
4. Parkinson’s Foundation, “Over the Counter and Complementary Therapies”, PARKINSON.ORG

*These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

B12 the Powerhouse Energy Vitamin – Try Simplesa Liposomal

Simplesa B12Even when you eat well and have a healthy diet you may still not be getting enough vitamin B12. When you are deficient there are symptoms, health risks, but you can easily address the deficiency with a quality B12 supplement.[1]

What is B12?
One form of Vitamin B12 is Methylcobalamin. It is one of the many B vitamins. Your body needs B12 to facilitate the healthy function of nerve tissue, brain function, and red blood cells.

Vitamin B12 is a powerhouse. Your metabolism wouldn’t run smoothly without it. But B12 isn’t like other vitamins. It’s only found in animal products like eggs, meat, shellfish and dairy. Up to 15% of people don’t get enough B12, and they’re more likely to be vegetarians, have celiac disease or other digestion problems, or be an adult over 50. The signs of vitamin B12 deficiency include exhaustion, rapid heartbeat, brain fog, and other symptoms, says Maggie Moon, RD, a Los Angeles–based nutritionist and owner of Everyday Healthy Eating.[2]

Like all B vitamins, vitamin B12 is a water-soluble vitamin. The human body does not store it. Any excess or unwanted amounts are excreted through urine. Structurally, vitamin B12 is the most complicated vitamin. It is also the largest.[3]

Why is Vitamin B12 so Important to our body?
Our bodies need vitamin B12 but do not make it and have to acquire it via proper nutrition and/or supplementation. Vitamin B12 is critical in the production of DNA, nerves, red blood cells, and to carry out other metabolic functions.  An average healthy adult requires approximately 2.4 micrograms a day, which can be an issue if you’re not consuming enough to meet your bodily needs. Some people may have an adequate intake of the appropriate nutrition, but malabsorption prevents them from utilizing it no matter how much they consume.

As a result, vitamin B12 deficiency is relatively common, especially among older people. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey estimated that 3.2% of adults over age 50 have a seriously low B12 level, and up to 20% may have a borderline deficiency.[4]

Do I have a B12 deficiency?
Vitamin B12 deficiency can be slow to develop, causing symptoms to appear gradually and intensify over time. It can also come on relatively quickly. Given the array of symptoms it can cause; the condition can be overlooked or confused with something else. Symptoms may include:

·         strange sensations, numbness, or tingling in the hands, legs, or feet

·         difficulty walking (staggering, balance problems)

·         anemia

·         a swollen, inflamed tongue

·         yellowed skin (jaundice)

·         difficulty thinking and reasoning (cognitive difficulties), or memory loss

·         paranoia or hallucinations

·         weakness

·         fatigue

While an experienced physician may be able to detect a vitamin B12 deficiency with a good interview and physical exam, a blood test is needed to confirm the condition. Early detection and treatment is important. “If left untreated, the deficiency can cause severe neurologic problems and blood diseases,” says Dr. Bruce Bistrian, chief of clinical nutrition at Harvard-affiliated Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.[5]

How can I avoid B12 Deficiency?
Simplesa® has just introduced its newest powerhouse supplement and high quality Liposomal Vitamin B12! Not all B12 vitamins are the same, Simplesa Liposomal Vitamin B12 boasts Methylcobalamin, the active form of vitamin B12 that supports brain and nerve health. With other forms of B12 your liver has to convert cyanocobalamin, another form of B12, into methylcobalamin.  Simplesa Liposomal Vitamin B12 is formulated for maximum and rapid absorption.

Simplesa Liposomal Vitamin B12 supports brain and nerve health with increased energy levels by providing methylcobalamin, the only form of vitamin B12 found in the brain.  Simplesa Liposomal Vitamin B12   does NOT contain soy ingredients, and the flavors are completely natural and delicious. The liposomes are gluten-free, alcohol-free, vegan, and tested non-GMO.

Simplesa Liposomal Vitamin B12 Benefit vs. Injectable B12
While injectable B12 is a commonly prescribed treatment for vitamin B12 deficiency, it does have some notable drawbacks. Because vitamin B12 injections are intramuscular, they can be difficult to administer to thin patients. Injections are also known to be painful, which may cause some patients to abandon treatment. Moreover, elderly or disabled patients may have difficulties traveling to a physician’s office for injection administration or affording the treatment if they don’t have insurance to cover it. [6] Additionally, the ease and cost savings is substantial via Simplesa Vitamin B12 as it can be easily self-administered at home and has a pleasant taste. One bottle will provide approximately 60 servings at ½ ml (approx. 3 pumps into the mouth) or 1000 mcg per serving.

Some of the many benefits of Simplesa Liposomal Vitamin B12:

·         Contributes to normal red blood cell formation

·         Supports the nervous system and mental functions

·         Contributes to a normal, healthy metabolism

·         Is essential for a healthy heart

Simplesa Liposomal Vitamin B12 uses natural non-hydrogenated sunflower phosphatidylcholine, derived from non-GMO certified oil.  It undergoes a several-step solvent-free purification and filtration process to ensure the utmost purity. The manufacturing facility is cGMP certified, following the same standards of sanitation and documentation as pharmaceutical companies. Each ingredient has been carefully sourced and tested in-house and by a third-party certified lab. The water is classified as Ultrapure Water, exceeding pharmaceutical grade standards.

For more information or to try our new Simplesa Liposomal Vitamin B12 click here.

[1] https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminB12-HealthProfessional/
[2] http://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20924065,00.html
[3] http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/219822.php
[4]  http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/vitamin-b12-deficiency-can-be-sneaky-harmful-201301105780
[5] http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/vitamin-b12-deficiency-can-be-sneaky-harmful-201301105780
[6] http://www.livestrong.com/article/289321-sublingual-vitamin-b12-vs-injectable-b12/

INTRODUCING OUR 2018 LOYALTY PROGRAM

We are pleased to launch our new 2018 Simplesa Loyalty Program. This program will enable you to earn rewards on your Simplesa purchases that can be used for discounts on future orders. Importantly, there is no expiration date on the points you earn. Get points for all your orders, and sometimes we’ll offer special opportunities to earn bonus points. You can keep track of your points by logging into your Simplesa account. Thank you for being a valued customer.

 

Simplesa Rewards Overview

SimplesaLoyalty

175 Points = $5 Voucher


330 Points = $10 Voucher


600 Points = $15 Voucher


900 Points = $25 Voucher


1,100 Points = $35 Voucher


1,500 Points = $50 Voucher


2,100 Points = $75 Voucher



2,600 Points = $100 Voucher


3,750 Points = $150 Voucher


4,000 Points = $200 Voucher


 

Start Earning Points

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
How do I enroll?
To enroll, you just have to create an account at SimplesaNutrition.com
Do I have to enroll if I am already a Customer?
We have already enrolled everyone with an active account and even rewarded you with 50 points to start the New Year.
When does the program begin?
The program begins January 1st, 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tips for Caregivers

 caregivingCaregiving – It’s one of the hardest, physically and emotionally draining roles anyone can undertake.  In a 2015 survey from AARP and the National Alliance of Caregiving it was found that a third of all Americans are caregivers, providing care to someone who is disabled, ill or elderly.  The same study found that almost 80% of these caregivers stated they needed help.[1] Caregivers can be family members or friends. Many caregivers have jobs, families, and the additional responsibility of the minute to minute needs of the person to whom they are providing care 24/7.  It is not just driving to doctor visits or making meals. Many caregivers are providing nursing care (maintaining Stomas, catheters, or feeding tubes), often without the training or previous experience to do so. Caregivers learn quickly as the lives and well-being of someone they love relies on them. Perhaps the person being cared for is not a good patient, or does not remember you, or has tremendous guilt in being ill or helpless. These are all potential circumstances that many caregivers have to face every day. It’s one of the experiences in life that unless you have done it – you won’t quite understand the demands or the challenges.

Tips for Caregiver:

The first rule of taking care of others: take care of yourself first. Caregiving can be a rewarding experience, but it is also physically and emotionally demanding. The stress of dealing with caregiving responsibilities leads to a higher risk of health issues among the nation’s 90 million family caregivers. So as a family caregiver, remember to pay attention to your own physical and mental wellness, and get proper rest and nutrition. Only by taking care of yourself can you be strong enough to take care of your loved one. You really do need to “take care to give care!”

  • Caregiving can be a stressful job. Most family caregivers say they feel stressed providing care for a loved one. With all of their caregiving responsibilities – from managing medications to arranging doctor appointments to planning meals – caregivers too often put themselves last.
  • The stress of caregiving impacts your own health. One out of five caregivers admit they have sacrificed their own physical health while caring for a loved one. Due to stress, caregivers have a disproportionate number of health and emotional problems. They are twice as likely to suffer depression and are at increased risk for many other chronic conditions.
  • Proper nutrition helps promote good health. Ensuring that you are getting proper nutrition is key to help maintain your strength, energy and stamina, as well as strengthening your immune system. Maintaining a healthy diet is one of the most powerful things you can do to take care of yourself and keep a positive attitude overall.
  • Ensuring good nutrition for your loved one helps make care easier. As many as half of all older adults are at risk for malnutrition. Good nutrition can help maintain muscle health, support recovery, and reduce risk for re-hospitalization – which may help make your care of a loved one easier.
  • Remember: “Rest. Recharge. Respite.” People think of respite as a luxury, but considering caregivers’ higher risk for health issues from chronic stress, those risks can be a lot costlier than some time away to recharge. The chance to take a breather, the opportunity to re-energize, is vital in order for you to be as good a caregiver tomorrow as you were today.[2]

What is Respite?

According to the Lifespan Respite Care Act (PL 109-442), Lifespan Respite is defined as ‘coordinated systems of community-based respite for family caregivers of children or adults regardless of special need.’  For more information, on Respite please visit: https://archrespite.org/index.php

Tips for Others:

As a caregiver your world at times feels like it’s in chaos and out of your control.  Interacting with other people can often be tiresome and difficult as you simply feel too overwhelmed to participate in social settings. Other people often want to help and support you, but struggle with what they can say and do to help.  We have compiled some great suggestions for what to say or not to say to caregivers.  Please feel free to send suggestions we have not mentioned in this blog. Interesting enough, there is some overlap on the advice on what best to say or not to say to caregivers. Bottom line:  speak from the heart and be supportive of their needs.

12 Things You Should Say to a Family Caregiver By Becky Benishek

Keep in mind many caregivers won’t ask for help, so the best way to help someone is to do things for them that they may not have the time, money, or mental energy to do for themselves. Social settings and activities may at times be too draining, or the fear of being a “bummer” or not in “the best mood” can often cause many caregivers to go into recluse mode.

A Dozen Things You Should Never Say to A Caregiver by Ann Brenoff

There is assistance and resources to help caregivers.  Many times a caregiver is so consumed in the day to day tasks of caregiving they don’t have the bandwidth to research tools or support.  One such resource is geared to caregivers of Veterans.  Per the Veteran Benefits: Caregiver Programs and Services on Military.com website:

On May 5, 2010, the Caregivers and Veterans Omnibus Health Services Act of 2010 was signed into law. Title I of the Act will allow VA to provide unprecedented benefits to eligible Caregivers (a parent, spouse, child, step-family member, extended family member, or an individual who lives with the Veteran, but is not a family member) who support the Veterans who have given so much for this Nation. The law distinguishes between Veterans who incurred or aggravated a serious injury in the line of duty on or after Sept. 11, 2001 (post-9/11 Veterans), and those Veterans whose injuries were incurred prior to Sept. 11, 2001 (pre-9/11 Veterans).

Please visit the VA’s caregiver page for more information, and to apply for these services.

 Caregivers Toolbox:

http://caregiveraction.org/family-caregiver-toolbox

http://www.caregiving.org/resources/

http://www.rosalynncarter.org/caregiver_resources/

https://www.medicare.gov/campaigns/caregiver/caregiver.html

http://www.aarp.org/home-family/caregiving/?cmp=RDRCT-CRGNG_APR12_012

http://www.easterseals.com/explore-resources/for-caregivers/understanding-aging-and-caregiving.html

Footnotes:

[1] http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/a-dozen-things-you-should-never-say-to-a-caregiver_us_5621409fe4b08589ef474317

[2] http://caregiveraction.org/national-family-caregivers-month-theme/

The Deanna Protocol® Continues to Impress ALS Patients

The Deanna Protocol is an all-natural metabolic program developed by Dr. Vincent Tedone which is continuing to improve the quality of life for people with ALS.

It was just a few years ago that the Ice Bucket Challenge caught everyone’s eye and raised awareness for ALS, or Lou Gehrig ’s disease.  At the time the Deanna Protocol® was relatively new but it was already helping many ALS patient’s lives.  According to a study by Winning the Fight, which researches “The Deanna Protocol,” a metabolic therapy with Deanna Protocol supplementation delays disease progression and extends survival in an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) mouse model.[1] The benefits of the Deanna Protocol to patients with ALS (PALS) is evident in the anecdotal feedback in recent years.

The Deanna Protocol® Metabolic Plan (also known as the DP™Plan) is a natural, drug-free, and inexpensive metabolic program developed for ALS. Scientific studies have proven that the DP™ Plan significantly slows the progression of ALS and extends life span. The DP™Plan is not an ALS treatment drug like Rilutek/Riluzole. It is a list of substances (AAKG, AKG, GABA, CoQ10, Niacin, and 5HTP) that are already found in the body. However, the amounts found in the body are not nearly enough for those who have ALS, so the DP™Plan provides the body and nerve cells with more of these substances to compensate for what they lack.  It is determined that the substances in the DP™ Plan provide energy to cells that are dying and in doing so keeps them alive.  This is very important because when nerve cells die, they release glutamate which kills the contiguous cells.[2]

In 2014 CBN News wrote that ‘Deanna Protocol’ Makes a Splash in ALS Research’. The study found “mice on The Deanna Protocol had improved neurological scores, increased motor function and most importantly, survived longer than the mice who weren’t on it.”[3]  Since this initial article, the Deanna Protocol has evolved in several major ways, in conjunction with assistance from Simplesa’s commitment to the ALS Community.  Simplesa® was founded in 2013 because it saw a need and had a solution.  ALS patients were having success following the Deanna Protocol, but it was too complex and expensive the way it was distributed. Simplesa® formulated products specifically for these ALS patients to simplify their regimen and lower the cost of the metabolic protocol.

Now all of the products needed to follow the protocol are offered in easy to follow combinations. Due to the improved ease of following the Deanna Protocol with the Simplesa products, the number of people following the protocol has increased. As the number of PALS following the Deanna Protocol has increased, Simplesa has also been able to reduce the cost of the protocol.  Additionally, to add further savings and flexibility to PALS, Simplesa® and Winning the Fight® teamed up to break the Deanna Protocol down into three bundled and more personalized options: Deanna Protocol Core, Plus, and Comprehensive Bundles.

The Deanna Protocol Core Bundle focuses on six essential nutrients of the Deanna Protocol. These nutrients primary support providing energy production to the body through the mitochondria of the cells.  The Plus Bundle builds on the Core Bundle by adding in Liposomal Glutathione, which helps the body push out toxins. It is considered the best antioxidant for the nervous system.  The Comprehensive Bundle builds on the Plus Bundle by adding in the AM & PM Blends. These blends come in two powders, one for the morning and one for the evening, and they contain an additional 20 amino acids that support muscle and nerve health. These combinations are based on the research publication by the NIH on nutrients that should be consumed by people who have ALS.

The affirmative feedback and reports from PALS to Simplesa® on the Deanna Protocol® have been very positive in the years since its inception.  PALS have continued to report improvement in quality of life:

“This product has worked wonders helping to reduce my pain, improve energy, lessen the severity muscle spasms, as well as improve balance and vertigo. I notice a day and night difference within taking my morning dose. I recommend taking the AKG throughout the day, not in lump 3 times a day to improve energy life.”

“My husband has been on the Deanna Protocol Products for two months now. He feels he has more energy and strength. We Would recommend these products!”

For more personal accounts on how the Deanna Protocol is helping PALS please click here.

The Deanna Protocol is not a cure for ALS, but it is a natural metabolic protocol that can help PALS improve their quality of life. To find out more about the Deanna Protocol® please contact Simplesa’s support team for information to see how it can help you or someone you know impacted by ALS.

References

*http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/313919.php

[1] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25061944
[2] https://www.winningthefight.org/deanna-protocolreg-metabolic-plan-for-als.html
[3] http://www1.cbn.com/cbnnews/healthscience/2014/August/Deanna-Protocol-Gains-Ground-in-ALS-Research

Simplesa Liposomal B12 the Powerhouse Energy Vitamin

Simplesa B12Even when you eat well and have a healthy diet you may still not be getting enough vitamin B12. When you are deficient there are symptoms, health risks, but you can easily address the deficiency with a quality B12 supplement.[1]

What is B12?
One form of Vitamin B12 is Methylcobalamin. It is one of the many B vitamins. Your body needs B12 to facilitate the healthy function of nerve tissue, brain function, and red blood cells.

Vitamin B12 is a powerhouse. Your metabolism wouldn’t run smoothly without it. But B12 isn’t like other vitamins. It’s only found in animal products like eggs, meat, shellfish and dairy. Up to 15% of people don’t get enough B12, and they’re more likely to be vegetarians, have celiac disease or other digestion problems, or be an adult over 50. The signs of vitamin B12 deficiency include exhaustion, rapid heartbeat, brain fog, and other symptoms, says Maggie Moon, RD, a Los Angeles–based nutritionist and owner of Everyday Healthy Eating.[2]

Like all B vitamins, vitamin B12 is a water-soluble vitamin. The human body does not store it. Any excess or unwanted amounts are excreted through urine. Structurally, vitamin B12 is the most complicated vitamin. It is also the largest.[3]

Why is Vitamin B12 so Important to our body?
Our bodies need vitamin B12 but do not make it and have to acquire it via proper nutrition and/or supplementation. Vitamin B12 is critical in the production of DNA, nerves, red blood cells, and to carry out other metabolic functions.  An average healthy adult requires approximately 2.4 micrograms a day, which can be an issue if you’re not consuming enough to meet your bodily needs. Some people may have an adequate intake of the appropriate nutrition, but malabsorption prevents them from utilizing it no matter how much they consume.

As a result, vitamin B12 deficiency is relatively common, especially among older people. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey estimated that 3.2% of adults over age 50 have a seriously low B12 level, and up to 20% may have a borderline deficiency.[4]

Do I have a B12 deficiency?
Vitamin B12 deficiency can be slow to develop, causing symptoms to appear gradually and intensify over time. It can also come on relatively quickly. Given the array of symptoms it can cause; the condition can be overlooked or confused with something else. Symptoms may include:

·         strange sensations, numbness, or tingling in the hands, legs, or feet

·         difficulty walking (staggering, balance problems)

·         anemia

·         a swollen, inflamed tongue

·         yellowed skin (jaundice)

·         difficulty thinking and reasoning (cognitive difficulties), or memory loss

·         paranoia or hallucinations

·         weakness

·         fatigue

While an experienced physician may be able to detect a vitamin B12 deficiency with a good interview and physical exam, a blood test is needed to confirm the condition. Early detection and treatment is important. “If left untreated, the deficiency can cause severe neurologic problems and blood diseases,” says Dr. Bruce Bistrian, chief of clinical nutrition at Harvard-affiliated Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.[5]

How can I avoid B12 Deficiency?
Simplesa® has just introduced its newest powerhouse supplement and high quality Liposomal Vitamin B12! Not all B12 vitamins are the same, Simplesa Liposomal Vitamin B12 boasts Methylcobalamin, the active form of vitamin B12 that supports brain and nerve health. With other forms of B12 your liver has to convert cyanocobalamin, another form of B12, into methylcobalamin.  Simplesa Liposomal Vitamin B12 is formulated for maximum and rapid absorption.

Simplesa Liposomal Vitamin B12 supports brain and nerve health with increased energy levels by providing methylcobalamin, the only form of vitamin B12 found in the brain.  Simplesa Liposomal Vitamin B12   does NOT contain soy ingredients, and the flavors are completely natural and delicious. The liposomes are gluten-free, alcohol-free, vegan, and tested non-GMO.

Simplesa Liposomal Vitamin B12 Benefit vs. Injectable B12
While injectable B12 is a commonly prescribed treatment for vitamin B12 deficiency, it does have some notable drawbacks. Because vitamin B12 injections are intramuscular, they can be difficult to administer to thin patients. Injections are also known to be painful, which may cause some patients to abandon treatment. Moreover, elderly or disabled patients may have difficulties traveling to a physician’s office for injection administration or affording the treatment if they don’t have insurance to cover it. [6] Additionally, the ease and cost savings is substantial via Simplesa Vitamin B12 as it can be easily self-administered at home and has a pleasant taste. One bottle will provide approximately 60 servings at ½ ml (approx. 3 pumps into the mouth) or 1000 mcg per serving.

Some of the many benefits of Simplesa Liposomal Vitamin B12:

·         Contributes to normal red blood cell formation

·         Supports the nervous system and mental functions

·         Contributes to a normal, healthy metabolism

·         Is essential for a healthy heart

Simplesa Liposomal Vitamin B12 uses natural non-hydrogenated sunflower phosphatidylcholine, derived from non-GMO certified oil.  It undergoes a several-step solvent-free purification and filtration process to ensure the utmost purity. The manufacturing facility is cGMP certified, following the same standards of sanitation and documentation as pharmaceutical companies. Each ingredient has been carefully sourced and tested in-house and by a third-party certified lab. The water is classified as Ultrapure Water, exceeding pharmaceutical grade standards.

For more information or to try our new Simplesa Liposomal Vitamin B12 click here.

[1] https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminB12-HealthProfessional/
[2] http://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20924065,00.html
[3] http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/219822.php
[4]  http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/vitamin-b12-deficiency-can-be-sneaky-harmful-201301105780
[5] http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/vitamin-b12-deficiency-can-be-sneaky-harmful-201301105780
[6] http://www.livestrong.com/article/289321-sublingual-vitamin-b12-vs-injectable-b12/

Metabolics and ALS

We often hear that we are what we eat.  Most people know how important it is to eat balanced healthy foods to stay healthy, but the importance of diet and nutrients is increased when you are ill. Often the symptoms or side effects of the disease are impaired metabolic function. Even eating a healthy diet won’t completely rectify this concern. Chronically ill patients sometimes can’t obtain the nutrients they require and/or the metabolizing process of nutrients has broken down. This breakdown impacts other critically important bodily functions.

Basics of Nutrition and Metabolism

Figure 1 – https://prezi.com/j5mbaoirevn1/copy-of-nutrition-vs-metabolism/#

In the recent article from National Institute of Health in November 2016 researchers found in the study “Metabolic Biomarkers and Neurodegeneration: A Pathway Enrichment Analysis of Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis”:

Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) lack robust diagnostics and prognostic biomarkers. Metabolomics is a postgenomics field that offers fresh insights for biomarkers of common complex as well as rare diseases. Using data on metabolite-disease associations published in the previous decade (2006-2016) in PubMed, ScienceDirect, Scopus, and Web of Science, we identified 101 metabolites as putative biomarkers for these three neurodegenerative diseases. Notably, uric acid, choline, creatine, L-glutamine, alanine, creatinine, and N-acetyl-L-aspartate were the shared metabolite signatures among the three diseases. The disease-metabolite-pathway associations pointed out the importance of membrane transport (through ATP binding cassette transporters), particularly of arginine and proline amino acids in all three neurodegenerative diseases. When disease-specific and common metabolic pathways were queried by using the pathway enrichment analyses, we found that alanine, aspartate, glutamate, and purine metabolism might act as alternative pathways to overcome inadequate glucose supply and energy crisis in neurodegeneration. These observations underscore the importance of metabolite-based biomarker research in deciphering the elusive pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases. Future research investments in metabolomics of complex diseases might provide new insights on AD, PD, and ALS that continue to place a significant burden on global health.[1]

A year earlier, another study published in JAMA, October 2015, “Association Between Dietary Intake and Function in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis” concluded:

 that Antioxidants, carotenes, fruits, and vegetables were associated with higher ALS function at baseline by regression of nutrient indices and weighted quantile sum regression analysis. We also demonstrated the usefulness of the weighted quantile sum regression method in the evaluation of diet. Those responsible for nutritional care of the patient with ALS should consider promoting fruit and vegetable intake since they are high in antioxidants and carotenes.[2]

Nutrition is especially important for ALS patients, and following the Deanna Protocol™ “supercharges” the right nutrition for patients with ALS (PALS). It also aids as a metabolic therapy and supports energy metabolism. A study published in 2014 by the National Institute of Health investigated and found that the Deanna Protocol® (DP):

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a neurodegenerative disorder of motor neurons causing progressive muscle weakness, paralysis, and eventual death from respiratory failure. There is currently no cure or effective treatment for ALS. Besides motor neuron degeneration, ALS is associated with impaired energy metabolism, which is pathophysiologically linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and glutamate excitotoxicity. The Deanna Protocol (DP) is a metabolic therapy that has been reported to alleviate symptoms in patients with ALS. In this study we hypothesized that alternative fuels in the form of TCA cycle intermediates, specifically arginine-alpha-ketoglutarate (AAKG), the main ingredient of the DP, and the ketogenic diet (KD), would increase motor function and survival in a mouse model of ALS (SOD1-G93A). ALS mice were fed standard rodent diet (SD), KD, or either diets containing a metabolic therapy of the primary ingredients of the DP consisting of AAKG, gamma-aminobutyric acid, Coenzyme Q10, and medium chain triglyceride high in caprylic triglyceride. Assessment of ALS-like pathology was performed using a pre-defined criteria for neurological score, accelerated rotarod test, paw grip endurance test, and grip strength test. Blood glucose, blood beta-hydroxybutyrate, and body weight were also monitored. SD+DP-fed mice exhibited improved neurological score from age 116 to 136 days compared to control mice. KD-fed mice exhibited better motor performance on all motor function tests at 15 and 16 weeks of age compared to controls. SD+DP and KD+DP therapies significantly extended survival time of SOD1-G93A mice by 7.5% (p = 0.001) and 4.2% (p = 0.006), respectively. Sixty-three percent of mice in the KD+DP and 72.7% of the SD+DP group lived past 125 days, while only 9% of the control animals survived past that point. Targeting energy metabolism with metabolic therapy produces a therapeutic effect in ALS mice which may prolong survival and quality of life in ALS patients.[3]

One thing shown over and over via these studies and anecdotal reports from PALS is that the Deanna Protocol® Metabolic Therapy is helping many PALS with quality of Life.

New studies are underway. the scientists at University of South Florida (USF) are moving forward with the experiment to determine the efficacy of the Deanna Protocol® Plan when combined with glutamic oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT). [4]

The DP® Plan focuses on cell metabolism. It delivers Alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG) to the Krebs Cycle in the neurons. The increase in AKG enables their mitochondria to produce enough energy to keep cells alive, despite their exposure to an unhealthy amount of extracellular glutamate.  AKG usually does not pass through the cell membranes in normal healthy cells.  Based on our experience, we found that the permeability of the cell membrane in diseased or damaged cells changes and allows AKG to permeate the cells. Due to the fact that AKG only enters diseased cells, the substance only goes where it is needed.

If you need more information on how Simplesa® Deanna Metabolic Plan can help you, please contact us for assistance.

Footnotes:

[1] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27828769

[2] http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaneurology/fullarticle/2570546

[3] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25061944

[4] https://www.winningthefight.org/latest-developments

Caregivers – “Take Care to Give Care”

 caregivingCaregiving – It’s one of the hardest, physically and emotionally draining roles anyone can undertake.  In a 2015 survey from AARP and the National Alliance of Caregiving it was found that a third of all Americans are caregivers, providing care to someone who is disabled, ill or elderly.  The same study found that almost 80% of these caregivers stated they needed help.[1] Caregivers can be family members or friends. Many caregivers have jobs, families, and the additional responsibility of the minute to minute needs of the person to whom they are providing care 24/7.  It is not just driving to doctor visits or making meals. Many caregivers are providing nursing care (maintaining Stomas, catheters, or feeding tubes), often without the training or previous experience to do so. Caregivers learn quickly as the lives and well-being of someone they love relies on them. Perhaps the person being cared for is not a good patient, or does not remember you, or has tremendous guilt in being ill or helpless. These are all potential circumstances that many caregivers have to face every day. It’s one of the experiences in life that unless you have done it – you won’t quite understand the demands or the challenges.

Tips for Caregiver:

The first rule of taking care of others: take care of yourself first. Caregiving can be a rewarding experience, but it is also physically and emotionally demanding. The stress of dealing with caregiving responsibilities leads to a higher risk of health issues among the nation’s 90 million family caregivers. So as a family caregiver, remember to pay attention to your own physical and mental wellness, and get proper rest and nutrition. Only by taking care of yourself can you be strong enough to take care of your loved one. You really do need to “take care to give care!”

  • Caregiving can be a stressful job. Most family caregivers say they feel stressed providing care for a loved one. With all of their caregiving responsibilities – from managing medications to arranging doctor appointments to planning meals – caregivers too often put themselves last.
  • The stress of caregiving impacts your own health. One out of five caregivers admit they have sacrificed their own physical health while caring for a loved one. Due to stress, caregivers have a disproportionate number of health and emotional problems. They are twice as likely to suffer depression and are at increased risk for many other chronic conditions.
  • Proper nutrition helps promote good health. Ensuring that you are getting proper nutrition is key to help maintain your strength, energy and stamina, as well as strengthening your immune system. Maintaining a healthy diet is one of the most powerful things you can do to take care of yourself and keep a positive attitude overall.
  • Ensuring good nutrition for your loved one helps make care easier. As many as half of all older adults are at risk for malnutrition. Good nutrition can help maintain muscle health, support recovery, and reduce risk for re-hospitalization – which may help make your care of a loved one easier.
  • Remember: “Rest. Recharge. Respite.” People think of respite as a luxury, but considering caregivers’ higher risk for health issues from chronic stress, those risks can be a lot costlier than some time away to recharge. The chance to take a breather, the opportunity to re-energize, is vital in order for you to be as good a caregiver tomorrow as you were today.[2]

What is Respite?

According to the Lifespan Respite Care Act (PL 109-442), Lifespan Respite is defined as ‘coordinated systems of community-based respite for family caregivers of children or adults regardless of special need.’  For more information, on Respite please visit: https://archrespite.org/index.php

Tips for Others:

As a caregiver your world at times feels like it’s in chaos and out of your control.  Interacting with other people can often be tiresome and difficult as you simply feel too overwhelmed to participate in social settings. Other people often want to help and support you, but struggle with what they can say and do to help.  We have compiled some great suggestions for what to say or not to say to caregivers.  Please feel free to send suggestions we have not mentioned in this blog. Interesting enough, there is some overlap on the advice on what best to say or not to say to caregivers. Bottom line:  speak from the heart and be supportive of their needs.

12 Things You Should Say to a Family Caregiver By Becky Benishek

Keep in mind many caregivers won’t ask for help, so the best way to help someone is to do things for them that they may not have the time, money, or mental energy to do for themselves. Social settings and activities may at times be too draining, or the fear of being a “bummer” or not in “the best mood” can often cause many caregivers to go into recluse mode.

A Dozen Things You Should Never Say to A Caregiver by Ann Brenoff

There is assistance and resources to help caregivers.  Many times a caregiver is so consumed in the day to day tasks of caregiving they don’t have the bandwidth to research tools or support.  One such resource is geared to caregivers of Veterans.  Per the Veteran Benefits: Caregiver Programs and Services on Military.com website:

On May 5, 2010, the Caregivers and Veterans Omnibus Health Services Act of 2010 was signed into law. Title I of the Act will allow VA to provide unprecedented benefits to eligible Caregivers (a parent, spouse, child, step-family member, extended family member, or an individual who lives with the Veteran, but is not a family member) who support the Veterans who have given so much for this Nation. The law distinguishes between Veterans who incurred or aggravated a serious injury in the line of duty on or after Sept. 11, 2001 (post-9/11 Veterans), and those Veterans whose injuries were incurred prior to Sept. 11, 2001 (pre-9/11 Veterans).

Please visit the VA’s caregiver page for more information, and to apply for these services.

 Caregivers Toolbox:

http://caregiveraction.org/family-caregiver-toolbox

http://www.caregiving.org/resources/

http://www.rosalynncarter.org/caregiver_resources/

https://www.medicare.gov/campaigns/caregiver/caregiver.html

http://www.aarp.org/home-family/caregiving/?cmp=RDRCT-CRGNG_APR12_012

http://www.easterseals.com/explore-resources/for-caregivers/understanding-aging-and-caregiving.html

Footnotes:

[1] http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/a-dozen-things-you-should-never-say-to-a-caregiver_us_5621409fe4b08589ef474317

[2] http://caregiveraction.org/national-family-caregivers-month-theme/

Getting Fishy with Omega-3s

For a long time, there has been a lot of debate over healthy and unhealthy fats. But it “was the Omega-3 fats that made fish famous.”[1]  Fatty Acids are required by our body. Our body does not make Omega -3 and it can only be obtained by certain foods or supplements.

The human body can make most of the types of fats it needs from other fats or raw materials. That isn’t the case for omega-3 fatty acids (also called omega-3 fats and n-3 fats). These are essential fats—the body can’t make them from scratch but must get them from food. Foods high in Omega-3 include fish, vegetable oils, nuts (especially walnuts), flax seeds, flaxseed oil, and leafy vegetables.[2]

Source http://newhope.com/news-analysis/share-educational-omega-3-infographic
Source http://newhope.com/news-analysis/share-educational-omega-3-infographic

Many people, either through poor dietary habits or health concerns, cannot eat the required foods to obtain these critical fats.  But remember, not all fats are created equal. Omega-3 fats have been revealed to assist with many of the essential processes of the body and deter health concerns.

Omega-3 fats provide the starting point for making hormones that regulate blood clotting, contraction and relaxation of artery walls, and inflammation. They also bind to receptors in cells that regulate genetic function. Likely due to these effects, omega-3 fats have been shown to help prevent heart disease and stroke, may help control lupus, eczema, and rheumatoid arthritis, and may play protective roles in cancer and other conditions.[3]

Simplesa® has just introduced its newest product, Omega 3 EFA (Essential Fatty Acids) which contains 1500 mg of Omega-3 Fatty Acids, 800 mg of EPA (Eicosapentaenoic Acid), 600 mg of DHA (Docosohexanoic Acid) and 100 mg of other Omega-3 Fatty Acids per two soft gel serving.   It contains the three main Omega-3 fats in the family of polyunsaturated fats.  The blend contains Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and other Omega-3 acids.  Simplesa has created a trifecta for one of the highest quality fish oil products on the market. The lemon flavored enteric coated soft gel allows for maximum absorption without the “fish burps” of some other Omega 3 supplements. It is perfect for those who are sensitive to the smell of the fish oil tablets. This super concentrated Omega-3 fish oil is an excellent source of Omega-3 fatty acids.

  • High quality lemon flavor fish oil for those who are sensitive to the taste of the fish oil tablets.
  • Multi-stage molecular distillation process that both concentrates the Omega 3 EPA and DHA and removes environmental toxins.
  • Concentrated Omega-3 provides an excellent source of Omega-3 fatty acids.

The timing of the launch of this new product aligns with a recent JAMA study published on Time.com that was released in June 2016.  This study supports the health benefits of Omega-3s.

Recently, a large study led by researchers at Tufts University and published in JAMA Internal Medicine added to the weight of evidence in favor of the fatty acids for heart health. The researchers looked at levels of omega-3s in the blood and tissue of 45,637 healthy people, using data from 19 prospective and retrospective studies, to see if there was a connection to coronary heart disease. They didn’t find a link between omega-3s and heart attacks in general, but they did find that people who had diets rich in fish-derived omega-3s had a lower risk of fatal heart attacks. How impressive the association depended on their omega-3 consumption. For every extra serving or so of fish a week, they saw about a 10% reduction in risk, and people who ate the most fish had about a 24% lower risk of fatal heart attack than people who ate the least.  “Evidence from experimental models and animal studies show that a major effect of these omega-3 fatty acids is to stabilize heart membranes,” says Liana Del Gobbo, lead author of the study who is now a research fellow at Stanford University. Stable heart membranes means the heart is less likely to go into life-threatening dangerous rhythms, adds O’Keefe (who was not involved with the study).[4]

Although consumption of important nutrients via diet is always ideal, not everyone can consistently consume the quantities recommended to benefit health. Also, some people just don’t like to eat fish, so finding a quality effective “non” fishy supplement is very important.  For more information on Simplesa® Omega 3 please click here.

.[1] http://time.com/4396909/omega-3s-heart-health-fish-oil/?xid=newsletter-brief

[2] https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/omega-3-fats/

[3] https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/omega-3-fats/

[4] http://time.com/4396909/omega-3s-heart-health-fish-oil/?xid=newsletter-brief

Sleep Well and Feel Better – Sleep Complex

When did getting enough sleep become such a challenge and complex?  For many people, sleeping well is a frustrating and debilitating part of their life.  What do you do to help you fall and stay asleep?

Everyone needs differing amounts of sleep to feel rested and maintain their physical and mental well-being. Without the appropriate length and quality of sleep, a person can suffer in how they think, react, and feel.  Everyone needs “healthy” sleep.  Lack of sleep has been shown to be a factor in “cardiovascular health, obesity, diabetes, and psychological wellbeing.”[1]  Lack of sleep is not only an issue for adults but recent studies have found too little sleep can be an issue in children as well.  Generally, if our kids are not sleeping neither are the parents.  In a recent article on Reuters Health, the dangers of children and teens getting too little sleep are discussed, and it notes new recommendations by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) guidelines.

“At least 25 percent of 12-year-olds get less than the recommended nine hours of sleep per night and there is increasing evidence that this impacts learning and memory,” said Dr. Stuart F. Quan of Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, a coauthor of the new American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) guidelines.[2]

During different parts of your life, you need to sleep to grow, recover from illness, and also maintain the equilibrium of your body’s natural resources.  For those with chronic pain from injury or who have a chronic illness, adequate sleep can actually improve the degree of pain.  Understandably, that proves to be a catch 22 as many with chronic pain just cannot sleep.  Many times, not sleeping is also an indicator of a bigger health issue.  If you have always slept well, then suddenly are experiencing problems, looking at your overall health and stress level is important to determine the cause and find a solution.

There is abundant scientific data and links between the lack of sleep as a factor or sign of serious health problems.  Sleep deprivation impacts your mind and body on every level. When you are over-tired you’re more likely to get injured, pay less attention to details or safety, your memory is impaired, become more easily angered, and are at a heightened risk to injury and/or accident.  You may become unable to focus, very irritable, and or in some severe cases become irrational.

Studies have also shown a direct correlation to sleep deprivation and weight control.  This makes sense, as being very tired will discourage you from regular exercise or you may eat unhealthy foods for a quick boost of energy or comfort.

The other part is physiological. The hormone leptin plays a key role in making you feel full. When you don’t get enough sleep, leptin levels drop. Result: people who are tired are just plain hungrier — and they seem to crave high-fat and high-calorie foods specifically.[3]Your Immunity seems impacted by lack of sleep.

There are a lot of myths that suggest what you can or cannot do to fall and stay asleep.  Some suggestions to getting more sleep:

  1. Regular Exercise – but not too close to bedtime.
  2. Don’t use television for “white noise” – try relaxing timed music instead.
  3. Avoid prescribed or narcotic sleep aids as they can often can become addictive, and can relieve insomnia but don’t cure it.
  4. Try natural supplements that are healthy and non-addictive.

Sleep ComplexSimplesa® has a new product that combines all the best herbal and natural ingredients to aid in a healthy and natural sleep.  Sleep Complex is a unique dietary sleep supplement with multi-nutrient & herb complex. Simplesa Sleep Complex combines the natural, powerful combination of B-6 (pyridoxine hydrochloride), Magnesium (gluconate), Melatonin, Valerian Root Powder, Hops Flower Powder, Passion Flower Powder, and Chamomile Flower Powder. This propriety blend leverages traditional herbalism in a propriety formula. It is recommended to take one to two capsules per evening of the natural sleep supplement, and it will soothe your mind and encourage a natural sleep cycle.  Highlights of this natural sleep aid are:

  • High Absorption Melatonin promotes the body’s natural sleep cycle in a non-addictive sleep aid.
  • Herbal sleep supplement triggers important natural sleep transmitters within the body and helps to balance hormonal function and the musculoskeletal system.
  • Proprietary Herbal Sleep Formula eases and calms your body into a natural sleep cycle for a restful night.

These various natural ingredients are known to help sleep:

Calcium is a natural sleep aid that can help you fall asleep and have a restful sleep. The mineral contains tryptophan, an amino acid the body uses to produce melatonin, a natural hormone that helps induce and maintain sleep, the National Sleep Foundation reports. Research shows low calcium levels are associated with disturbed sleep patterns, including the lack of a deep REM sleep phase, according to Medical News Today. When levels of calcium are inadequate, you may wake up soon after falling asleep and have trouble getting back to sleep.[4]

Magnesium is well known for its ability to relieve insomnia. One study found that it helps decrease cortisol, the “stress hormone” that can keep you up at night. It also helps muscles relax, to give you that calm “sleepy” feeling and help you unwind after a long day. On top of helping you get a good night of sleep, it also shows potential as a therapy for depression and other mood disorders.[5]

Melatonin – Your body [naturally] makes melatonin, which helps create the urge to fall asleep,” says Sanjeev Kothare, M.D., director of the pediatric sleep program at NYU Langone Medical Center. “We call it ‘the hormone of the dark’ because it starts rising as it gets late and the light intensity [of the day] goes down.” Melatonin is key in regulating your body’s internal clock, also known as your circadian rhythm, says Andrew Westwood, M.D., a board-certified sleep physician and assistant professor at Columbia University.[6]

Getting a good night sleep just got easier with Simplesa Sleep Complex!  For more information on Sleep Complex please click here.

[1] http://www.sleephealthresearch.com/shrp/index.html

[2] http://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-kids-sleep-idUSKCN0YZ2DN

[3] http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/features/9-reasons-to-sleep-more?page=2

[4] http://www.livestrong.com/article/547625-benefits-of-calcium-before-bed/

[5] http://paleoleap.com/magnesium/

[6] http://dailyburn.com/life/lifestyle/sleep-what-is-melatonin/

Metabolic Support and ALS

As children we grew up with our parents and teachers telling us how important eating well was to our health.  Our bodies are delicately balanced between nutrition and energy. When we are ill, our body often requires additional energy or that metabolic relationship may become damaged.  Some diseases or their symptoms can cause or contribute to the metabolic imbalance.  In ALS, as the disease progresses, this imbalance can lead to “malnutrition, common with progression of disease, muscle strength and breathing capacity due to weakening as well as increase the relative risk of death.”[1]

A recent study was released in June 2016 which examined the relationship between nutrition status and the progression of ALS.  The study was “Association between estimated total daily energy expenditure and stage of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in ALS patients” and it wanted to “investigate the relationship between total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) and progression of disease in ALS patients and sex differences in TDEE.”[2]   The highlights of the study were:

●Total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) decreased with progression of ALS.
●Energy intake of ALS patients was not sufficient as compared with TDEE.
●Nutrition support should be started before stage 3 of ALS.

370 ALS patients’ TDEE were evaluated and followed in regard to resting energy expenditure (REE) and physical activity.  The results were that the TDEE decreased as the ALS progressed.  The study suggests:

that TDEE decreases with progression of ALS, and patients consume insufficient energy compared with required intake at all stages, particularly at stage 3, suggesting that nutrition support should be started at least prior to stage 3. Additionally, among the five equations for TDEE, TDEE 2 could be the best for evaluating the nutritional status of ALS patients.[3]

Previous studies and articles have examined the relationship between energy intake (nutrition) and ALS before.  In 2014 the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition released the article “Estimating daily energy expenditure in individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.”  Patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) experience progressive limb weakness, muscle atrophy, and dysphagia, making them vulnerable to insufficient energy intake. [4]

As with any chronic illness, nutritional support is critical.  The challenge is that the physical symptoms of ALS make energy intake difficult. Proactive and ongoing nutritional support and metabolic balance is important in the overall progression and well-being of the patient.

The study published online “Hypercaloric enteral nutrition in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial” emphasizes the need for a dietary and/or nutritional intervention to offset the metabolic dysfunction PALS experience.

In summary, we believe that our study results provide preliminary evidence for a novel, simple, low-cost, low-risk treatment for this devastating disease. The results of this study also support growing interest in the use of dietary interventions to treat neurological diseases. Our results also support the concept that ALS is a multi-organ systemic disease, characterized by metabolic dysfunction.3   We believe that given the promising results of this pilot study and lack of treatment options for ALS, nutritional interventions should be studied in larger randomized controlled trials at earlier stages of the disease.[5]

Simplesa® offers the metabolic plan called the Deanna Protocol for PALS.  This protocol has been found by many ALS patients to help quality of life and slow progression of the disease.  Additionally, other nutritional supplements are available to offset the metabolic balance and gain or maintain weight in PALS or others with health concerns where adequate nutritional intake is compromised or inadequate.

[1] http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0004-282X2014000200157

[2] http://www.nutritionjrnl.com/article/S0899-9007(16)30096-X/fulltext

[3] http://www.nutritionjrnl.com/article/S0899-9007(16)30096-X/fulltext

[4]https://www.researchgate.net/publication/262046313_Estimating_daily_energy_expenditure_in_individuals_with_amyotrophic_lateral_sclerosis

[5] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4176708/