Category Archives: Supplements

Co-Therapies and Nutritional Supplements for Parkinson’s Disease

This year alone, 50,000 Americans will be diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease (PD). The number of cases in the US suffering with PD will be close to 1.0 million patients by 2020. This neurological disorder is second in total number of patients only to Alzheimer’s disease. What’s concerning our physicians the most is that the number of cases seems to be increasing. A report from the Mayo Clinic in March 2019, showed that the incidence of PD has increased significantly in the 30 years between 1976 to 2005 (1).

Neurologists serve in the front lines of the fight against PD, ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis) and Alzheimer’s. Their work load is increasing and sadly, the number of qualified neurologists available to take care of us is not keeping up with the increasing number of cases of these diseases.

The reality of Parkinson’s disease is upon us and the trend tells the full story. We can do nothing… or we can begin to take action now. If you fall into the latter group (and we hope that you do) we’ve got some good news.

Patient education and self-help efforts are increasing. New treatments and local support groups are emerging that help disseminate valuable information to help fight PD. Taking responsibility for your health is THE smartest strategy. Expecting that our health care system will be there for us and take care of us during a chronic disease is not a bet one should take. Take responsibility for your PD.

In the event that you’ve been diagnosed or are currently suffering with PD, what do you do now? Here’re some therapies and co-therapies that will help you fight PD.

  1. Make sure that you’re being treated by your Doctor or Neurologist

    Step one is to make sure that you get yourself the best professional care you can get. You can find a neurologist near you on WebMD.

  2. L-dopa (Levodopa) Supplementation for PD

    This is the go to drug for PD. It helps increase dopamine levels that cause many of the symptoms associated with PD. Although it’s not a cure, it helps keep symptoms under control during the early stages. Remember that L-dopa cannot reduce every PD symptom. Talk to your physician about this therapy.

  3. Nutritional Supplements for Parkinson’s Disease

    The Parkinson’s Foundation lists certain Nutritional Supplements, such as anti-oxidants and vitamins, as possible Over the Counter (OTC) and Complementary Therapies (4). These nutritional supplements for Parkinson’s disease show improvements in the reduction of certain symptoms of the disease. Among the more promising natural remedies for PD are:

    1. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10): also known as Ubiquinone, seems to play an important role in Mitochondrial health, the power center of our cells. A more concentrated form of Ubiquinone is Ubiquinol. This powerful neural booster is present in the AAKG+ product from Simplesa Nutrition. This supplement is most helpful in reducing tremors and muscle rigidity.
    2. Vitamins E and C: can fight damage in the brain and neurons caused by free radicals and may even lower the risk of getting PD in the first place. These vitamins are most helpful in reducing damage to your neurons.
    3. Glutathione: is known as one of the most powerful antioxidants available. A better absorbing form of Glutathione is called Liposomal Glutathione. Few supplements have received the level of positive comments from the scientific community that Glutathione has received. This supplement is most helpful in reducing oxidative damage to your organs and nervous system.
    4. Vitamin B-12: also known as Methylcobalamine is an important vitamin in nerve and brain health and may have a significant effect in protecting our memory. Vegetarians often have an acute Vitamin B-12 deficiency. Look for sublingual Liposomal B-12 for best absorption. This supplement is most helpful in helping your higher brain functions and in protecting your memory.
    5. Multi-Vitamin supplements: The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has put together a list of recommended nutritional supplements for Parkinson’s for daily use. Most of these vitamins and minerals and in the appropriate dosages for healthy adults are available in Total Health AM. This multi-vitamin and multi-mineral is most helpful in providing the necessary building blocks for a healthy body to help fight disease and repair damage.
  4. Diet and Exercise

    We know we keep hearing about it but Diet (Mediterranean Diet) and Exercise keeps the body healthy, your immune system robust and your renal and endocrine (detoxing) systems humming along. Stay with this winning strategy!

  5. Embrace a Spiritual Life

    If you’re religious, great! If you’re more of a free spirit, that’s ok too. At the very least spend time on the inside. Meditate, pray, breathe deeply, be mindful and be thankful. These simple co-therapies will help you cope with your PD and with the everyday challenges of life. As someone once said, “Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away…”.

So there you have it. PD will probably change your life but it’s not necessarily a death sentence. If you take responsibility for your PD, the progression will be slower, you will be in control, live a quality life and you will most likely increase the number of moments… that take your breath away.

Stay Strong!

Source:
1. Thelen, Gil. “A Parkinson’s ‘pandemic’ is coming and there aren’t enough doctors to deal with it.”, THE MIAMI HERALD, March 25th, 2019.
2. Parkinson’s Foundation, “New Study Shows 1.2 Million People in the United States Estimated to be Living with Parkinson’s Disease by 2030”, PARKINSON.ORG, July 10th 2018.
3. Mayo Clinic. “Parkinson’s disease”, MAYOCLINIC.ORG.
4. Parkinson’s Foundation, “Over the Counter and Complementary Therapies”, PARKINSON.ORG

*These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Energy Expenditure in Nerve Cells continues to be a Trigger for ALS

blue neurons als treatment

Finding a cure for ALS continues to be a difficult and elusive endeavor. This is understandable since the body is a complex system. Moreover, the degree of difficulty of finding a cure goes up exponentially, when one talks about the body’s nervous system. Nevertheless, advances and findings are coming to light rather quickly and we may be one piece of the puzzle away from a major breakthrough.

One cannot help but notice that within these new findings, certain similar themes that trigger ALS keep coming up. One such theme is the damage caused by the increase in energy expenditure by the nerve cells. A recent study called “Consideration of gravity as a possible etiological factor in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis” that appeared in the journal Medical Hypotheses, suggests that nerve fibers that are disposed vertically (essentially oriented vertically) can accumulate too much cell waste. This cell waste accumulation can lead to damage to the nerve cell and even to cell death. The findings suggest that the uneven distribution of nerve cell loss in PALS, can have something to do with the fact that vertically oriented nerve cell bodies (axons) consume about 2% more energy than transverse running axons.

This may not seem like much but over a period of months and years this 2% excessive energy consumption, due to gravity, may cause the accumulation of waste in vertically running axons. This can deteriorate and weaken nerve cells and can lead to the onset of ALS. Other factors such as using your right hand more frequently (if you’re right handed), or excessive exercising, or your diet, or even your emotional wellbeing can all affect the progress of ALS.

Ok, so how do I counter the effects of excessive energy expenditure? I can’t stop my nerve cells from using energy! There’re a few strategies that we can recommend:

  1.  Avoid repetitive movements and try to change your body’s orientation throughout the day. There’s a recurring link between the deterioration of the nerve cells we use most and ALS. Making small adjustments throughout the day may help reduce the energy expenditure of the same nerve cells.
  2. Increase your intake of supplements that help your nerve cells produce energy. We recommend that you look at Simplesa AAKG+ or learn more about the Deanna Protocol.
  3. Increase the intake of supplements for ALS that help eliminate cell waste (such as excess Glutamate) and that help reduce oxidative damage. Try Oxaloacetate from Natural Dynamix Endure DX. Also try Liposomal Glutathione one of the most powerful anti-oxidants available.
  4. Engage in Moderate intensity exercise that is non-exhaustive and specifically designed for patients with ALS. Learn more here Exercise Program for ALS,
  5.  Do what you can to reduce stress and stay in reasonably good emotional balance. There are many natural remedies for ALS. Reduce coffee intake, practice Yoga and meditation, and develop a deeper spiritual life. You can also try natural Hemp Oil remedies. Proponents of Hemp Oil suggest that it may help with feelings of nervousness, anxiety, improved sleep and reduced pain.

The discoveries will continue to come. Each new finding will help our scientists complete this elusive puzzle and get us one step closer to a solution. The cure is out there. In the meantime, we can do what we can to reduce the rate of damage to our nerve cells. We can improve our exercise routine, our supplement intake, and our spiritual world. Choose to live your best life. Stay strong!

Source:
Pena, PhD., Ana. “Energy Demands to Counter Gravity in Vertical Neurons May Lie at Origin of ALS”, ALS NEWS TODAY, August 30th, 2019.

These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

20 things to know regarding Pharmaceutical vs. Nutraceutical protocols for ALS!

Radicava® vs Deanna Protocol®

To understand what the differences between Pharmaceutical and Nutraceutical are, we should begin with their definitions:

phar·ma·ceu·ti·cal

Adjective

  1. Relating to medicinal drugs, or their preparation, use, or sale.

Noun

  1. a compound manufactured for use as a medicinal drug.

nu·tra·ceu·ti·cal

Noun

Plural noun: nutraceuticals 

a food containing health-giving additives and having medicinal benefit.

Now, let’s compare the new drug approved by the FDA Radicava® vs The Natural alternative for a better quality of life, the Deanna Protocol®.

  • 10 Things to Know About the New ALS Drug Radicava®
  1. It is a Pharmaceutical drug.
  2. The drug underwent a phase 3 clinical trial in Japan and South Korea where 137 ALS patients were given either Radicava® or a placebo. The group given Radicava® experienced a 33 percent reduction in the decline of their physical abilities compared to the placebo group.
  3. Radicava® works by reducing the oxidative stress in the body. People with ALS have high levels of oxidative stress.
  4. Radicava® is administered via intravenous infusions. Initially, patients have a daily infusion for two weeks and then have two weeks’ rest. After that, they need to have 10 consecutive daily infusions followed by two weeks of rest.
  5. Each infusion takes around an hour to complete.
  6. The dosage of each infusion is 60 mg.
  7. The cost of each Radicava® infusion is about $1,000 and it’s reported that the treatment costs about $146,000 annually.
  8. Radicava® should be available to ALS patients in the U.S. by August.
  9. The most common side effects associated with the drug are headaches, bruising and gait problems.
  10. Radicava® infusion contains sodium bisulfite which is known to cause both mild and severe allergic reactions in some people (particularly those with asthma).
  • 10 Things to Know About the Deanna Protocol®
  1. It is a naturally derived Nutraceutical program.
  2. Developed by Doctor Vincent Tedone, a retired physician (Orthopedic Surgeon), for his daughter Deanna who was diagnosed with ALS at the age of 30 in 2007.
  3. The Deanna Protocol® has undergone double blind clinical trials at the University of South Florida in mice models. The Deanna Protocol® has over 1,500 anecdotal case studies from patients with ALS.
  4. The Deanna Protocol® is a blend of nutritional powders and liquids that contain powerful antioxidants and amino acids essential to assist your body in its natural efforts to fight neurodegenerative damage. People suffering from other neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, have also reported improvements.
  5. It is taken in the morning, in the afternoon and at night as part of your regular, at home, breakfast, lunch and dinner routine. No need to go to the clinic.
  6. The Protocol is the same for everyone but the dosages might vary, depending on the person and what their specific needs are. The most common side effect is an upset stomach usually reported during the initial days as the body adjusts to the protocol.
  7. The cost of the Deanna Protocol® starts at $219.99 for the Core Bundle #1. The next most inclusive package is the Plus Bundle #1 at $249.99. And our most inclusive bundle is the Comprehensive Bundle #1 at $349.99. Above prices are for a 1 month supply and include easy-to-follow, step-by-step instructions and an actual human to answer your questions and provide you with the support you need.
  8. Not sure? At Simplesa’s website there’re 330+ reviews with 4.5 stars from verified and satisfied buyers at simplesanutrition.com or call 1-888-578-5528.
  9. Deanna Protocol® has been in the market for almost 4 years. The popularity of the protocol and the positive reports from the clients, speak for themselves.
  10. The freshness of the products used in the Deanna Protocol is guaranteed, these products are naturally derived and are manufactured in a facility that follows strict Current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) (Enforced by the FDA) and is UL (Underwriters Laboratories) certified.

 This Blog is for educational purposes. We hope that the above information helps you make the right decisions to address your neuro-degenerative concerns. And as always consult your physician.

 If you liked this article, please share with others
that could benefit from this information.
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These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any diseases.

Sources:
alsnewstoday.com
winningthefight.org
simplesanutrition.com/deanna-protocol/

 

Lunasin and Its Benefits

Lunasin has been getting a lot of press, research and attention for benefiting a variety of health conditions. It is important to understand the science behind Lunasin, and how it can help your body.

Lunasin is natural, and found in soy, barley, and rye.  It is a 43-amino acid polypeptide with poly (L-aspartic acid) sequence at the carboxyl terminus.

Proteins and peptides are fundamental components of cells that carry out important biological functions. Proteins give cells their shape, for example, and they respond to signals transmitted from the extracellular environment. Certain types of peptides play key roles in regulating the activities of other molecules. Structurally, proteins and peptides are very similar, being made up of chains of amino acids that are held together by peptide bonds (also called amide bonds).

So, what distinguishes a peptide from a protein?

The basic distinguishing factors are size and structure. Peptides are smaller than proteins. Traditionally, peptides are defined as molecules that consist of between 2 and 50 amino acids, whereas proteins are made up of 50 or more amino acids. In addition, peptides tend to be less well defined in structure than proteins, which can adopt complex conformations known as secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structures. [1]

Lunasin is a “bioactive” peptide which means it is a compound that influences living things and their core elements – like tissue and cells. Bioactive compounds have been shown via research and studies to have an influence on health. Areas of Lunasin research have focused on cancer, cholesterol, cardiovascular, inflammation, skin health and anti-aging.  Let’s examine these studies and how the science supports the benefits of Lunasin on your health and well-being.

Cancer

For over a decade research has shown “Lunasin as a cancer-preventive soy peptide.”[2] Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center indicated that:

Studies in animals suggest that soy can prevent or reduce bone loss. In laboratory studies, iso- flavones slowed down the growth of several different types of cancer cells, including breast and prostate cancers. Animal studies showed that genistein, one of the isoflavones, may interfere with tamoxifen that is used for breast cancer. But a new study showed that soy foods can benefit women with breast cancer. Patients should consult their physicians about use of soy supplements.[3]

Skin Health

In 2017 a study stated that “The soy-derived peptide Lunasin inhibits invasive potential of melanoma initiating cells” and concluded that “Our studies suggest that Lunasin represents a unique anticancer agent that could be developed to help prevent metastasis and patient relapse by reducing the activity of CICs which are known to be resistant to current chemotherapies.”[4]

Cholesterol & Cardiovascular Health

The 2016 study “Identification of Lunasin as the Active Component in Soy Protein Responsible for Reducing LDL Cholesterol and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease” published by American Heart Association, Inc. found that:

Soy protein has an approved FDA health claim for reducing LDL cholesterol and CVD risk but the active component and mechanism of action are unknown. They tested the hypothesis that the lunasin peptide is the active component in soy protein responsible for lowering LDL cholesterol.

Using a lunasin bioactivity assay, we were able to produce a lunasin-enriched soy extract (LSE) containing 100-200-fold more bioactive lunasin than soy protein isolates. To test the in vivo efficacy of LSE, we conducted a food supplementation experiment on five pigs that have high LDL cholesterol due to mutations in their LDL receptor genes. The pigs were fed casein-based diets and after two weeks their casein diet was supplemented with 250 mg LSE every day for eight weeks. Blood draws and lipid panel testing were done at -2w (before casein diet), 0w (2 weeks casein), 4w (4w casein + 250 mg LES) and 8w (8w casein + 250 mg LES). Results showed that casein diet increased LDL cholesterol levels in the LDL-R mutant pigs by an average of 6.7%. The addition of 250 mg of LES in case in diet reduced LDL cholesterol by 8.6% and 6.4% after 4 and 8 weeks of treatment, respectively. These results prove that lunasin is the active nutrient in soy protein responsible for LDL cholesterol lowering and its mechanism of action is by reducing cholesterol biosynthesis in the liver.[5]

Inflammation

Inflammation has an impact on all areas of health and well-being.

Inflammation is part of the host defense mechanism against harmful matters and injury; however, aberrant inflammation is associated to the development of chronic diseases such as cancer. Lunasin is a novel peptide that demonstrates potential anticancer activity against mammalian cancer cell lines and may play a role in inflammation. In conclusion, lunasin and lunasin-like peptides purified from defatted soybean flour inhibited inflammation in LPS-induced.[6]

Although inflammation is linked in the public mind with chronic health problems such as heart disease, diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis, de Mejia said it also plays a role in the development of cancer. “We know that chronic inflammation is associated with an increased risk of malignancies, that it’s a critical factor in tumor progression,” she said. “And we can see that daily consumption of lunasin-rich soy protein may help to reduce chronic inflammation.[7]

Obesity

A study in 2017 examined the relationship between inflammation and obesity. The study was called “Lunasin attenuates obesity-related inflammation in RAW264.7 cells and 3T3-L1 adipocytes by inhibiting inflammatory cytokine production”.

This study indicated that lunasin is not only effective against inflammatory response of RAW264.7 macrophages, but also highlights this suppressive property on 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and disrupts the crosstalk between macrophages and adipocytes, particularly by inhibiting secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators, might benefit to ameliorate obesity-induced inflammatory diseases.[8]

Anti-Aging

Lunasin has been shown to help with anti-aging. Epigenetics shows the relationship of Lunasin to aging. Epigenetics is the study of long-term changes in chromosomes that don’t involve alterations in the genetic code.

But perhaps the most exciting area of aging epigenetics is the recent notion of an epigenetic clock, called Horvath’s clock, after its discoverer. The gist of it is that there is a strong association between the amount of genome-wide methylation and mortality. A lot of the genome is methylated when we are young but methylation is reduced in a constant clock-like way as we age. Methylation, recall, tends to silence genes. With age, it appears, an increasing number of genes that should be silenced are not, rendering us more susceptible to all manner of ailments. From reading the amount of methylation in the epigenome, scientists can predict an individual’s age with impressive accuracy.[9]

If you can utilize Lunasin to regulate or reset epigenetic implications of aging, then some studies believe we can reverse it.  One such study, examined this aspect of utilizing Lunasin for anti-aging. “Histone Modifications and Epigenetic Regulation Could Hold the Key to Reversing Aging” found that:

Results from a recent study conducted by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania show that yeast could help advance our progress in extending life in human cells. The team of researchers included Shelley Berger, PhD, professor in Cell & Developmental Biology and Biology & Genetics departments at the Perelman School of Medicine, Weiwei Dang, PhD, assistant professor at Baylor College of Medicine and former postdoc fellow at Penn, and Payel Sen, PhD, a current postdoc fellow in Berger’s lab. The study was published in Genes & Development and focused on how a certain epigenetic histone modification could extend yeast’s lifespan.

“Researchers have just started to appreciate how these epigenetic histone modifications may be playing essential roles in determining lifespan,” said Berger. She has conducted studies on epigenetic marks for more than 20 years and was one of the first to identify histone modifications that are altered during aging and directly impact longevity.

Dang explained that their study pinpointed a type of abnormal transcription that is significantly increased in older cells and, if reduced, can lengthen lifespan in yeast. He started the research when he was working in Berger’s lab.

He explained that “this longevity effect is mediated through an evolutionarily conserved chemical modification on histones [and] this is the first demonstration that such a mechanism exists to regulate aging.”

Although measuring aging in yeast is quite different from measuring human aging, Sen noted that using a budding yeast single-cell organism model turned out to be surprisingly powerful in their study of aging and epigenetic regulation.[10]

The research, science and benefits of Lunasin are clearly seen in these and many other scientific studies.

lunacell

 

 

Simplesa LunaCell™ is the most advanced Lunasin supplement on the market today. LunaCell has more than twice the concentration of bioavailable Lunasin than any other product available.  If you understand the science, then the choice is clear – choose LunaCell™!!

 

 

 

[1] https://www.britannica.com/demystified/what-is-the-difference-between-a-peptide-and-a-protein

[2] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15730231

[3] https://www.mskcc.org/cancer-care/integrative-medicine/herbs/soy

[4] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28424421

[5] http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/126/Suppl_21/A10693

[6] http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0196978109003416

[7] https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091202153946.htm

[8] http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0171969

[9] http://goop.com/understanding-epigenetics-and-what-it-means-for-aging-cancer-and-obesity/

[10] https://www.whatisepigenetics.com/histone-modifications-and-epigenetic-regulation-could-hold-the-key-to-reversing-aging/

Tips for Caregivers

 caregivingCaregiving – It’s one of the hardest, physically and emotionally draining roles anyone can undertake.  In a 2015 survey from AARP and the National Alliance of Caregiving it was found that a third of all Americans are caregivers, providing care to someone who is disabled, ill or elderly.  The same study found that almost 80% of these caregivers stated they needed help.[1] Caregivers can be family members or friends. Many caregivers have jobs, families, and the additional responsibility of the minute to minute needs of the person to whom they are providing care 24/7.  It is not just driving to doctor visits or making meals. Many caregivers are providing nursing care (maintaining Stomas, catheters, or feeding tubes), often without the training or previous experience to do so. Caregivers learn quickly as the lives and well-being of someone they love relies on them. Perhaps the person being cared for is not a good patient, or does not remember you, or has tremendous guilt in being ill or helpless. These are all potential circumstances that many caregivers have to face every day. It’s one of the experiences in life that unless you have done it – you won’t quite understand the demands or the challenges.

Tips for Caregiver:

The first rule of taking care of others: take care of yourself first. Caregiving can be a rewarding experience, but it is also physically and emotionally demanding. The stress of dealing with caregiving responsibilities leads to a higher risk of health issues among the nation’s 90 million family caregivers. So as a family caregiver, remember to pay attention to your own physical and mental wellness, and get proper rest and nutrition. Only by taking care of yourself can you be strong enough to take care of your loved one. You really do need to “take care to give care!”

  • Caregiving can be a stressful job. Most family caregivers say they feel stressed providing care for a loved one. With all of their caregiving responsibilities – from managing medications to arranging doctor appointments to planning meals – caregivers too often put themselves last.
  • The stress of caregiving impacts your own health. One out of five caregivers admit they have sacrificed their own physical health while caring for a loved one. Due to stress, caregivers have a disproportionate number of health and emotional problems. They are twice as likely to suffer depression and are at increased risk for many other chronic conditions.
  • Proper nutrition helps promote good health. Ensuring that you are getting proper nutrition is key to help maintain your strength, energy and stamina, as well as strengthening your immune system. Maintaining a healthy diet is one of the most powerful things you can do to take care of yourself and keep a positive attitude overall.
  • Ensuring good nutrition for your loved one helps make care easier. As many as half of all older adults are at risk for malnutrition. Good nutrition can help maintain muscle health, support recovery, and reduce risk for re-hospitalization – which may help make your care of a loved one easier.
  • Remember: “Rest. Recharge. Respite.” People think of respite as a luxury, but considering caregivers’ higher risk for health issues from chronic stress, those risks can be a lot costlier than some time away to recharge. The chance to take a breather, the opportunity to re-energize, is vital in order for you to be as good a caregiver tomorrow as you were today.[2]

What is Respite?

According to the Lifespan Respite Care Act (PL 109-442), Lifespan Respite is defined as ‘coordinated systems of community-based respite for family caregivers of children or adults regardless of special need.’  For more information, on Respite please visit: https://archrespite.org/index.php

Tips for Others:

As a caregiver your world at times feels like it’s in chaos and out of your control.  Interacting with other people can often be tiresome and difficult as you simply feel too overwhelmed to participate in social settings. Other people often want to help and support you, but struggle with what they can say and do to help.  We have compiled some great suggestions for what to say or not to say to caregivers.  Please feel free to send suggestions we have not mentioned in this blog. Interesting enough, there is some overlap on the advice on what best to say or not to say to caregivers. Bottom line:  speak from the heart and be supportive of their needs.

12 Things You Should Say to a Family Caregiver By Becky Benishek

Keep in mind many caregivers won’t ask for help, so the best way to help someone is to do things for them that they may not have the time, money, or mental energy to do for themselves. Social settings and activities may at times be too draining, or the fear of being a “bummer” or not in “the best mood” can often cause many caregivers to go into recluse mode.

A Dozen Things You Should Never Say to A Caregiver by Ann Brenoff

There is assistance and resources to help caregivers.  Many times a caregiver is so consumed in the day to day tasks of caregiving they don’t have the bandwidth to research tools or support.  One such resource is geared to caregivers of Veterans.  Per the Veteran Benefits: Caregiver Programs and Services on Military.com website:

On May 5, 2010, the Caregivers and Veterans Omnibus Health Services Act of 2010 was signed into law. Title I of the Act will allow VA to provide unprecedented benefits to eligible Caregivers (a parent, spouse, child, step-family member, extended family member, or an individual who lives with the Veteran, but is not a family member) who support the Veterans who have given so much for this Nation. The law distinguishes between Veterans who incurred or aggravated a serious injury in the line of duty on or after Sept. 11, 2001 (post-9/11 Veterans), and those Veterans whose injuries were incurred prior to Sept. 11, 2001 (pre-9/11 Veterans).

Please visit the VA’s caregiver page for more information, and to apply for these services.

 Caregivers Toolbox:

http://caregiveraction.org/family-caregiver-toolbox

http://www.caregiving.org/resources/

http://www.rosalynncarter.org/caregiver_resources/

https://www.medicare.gov/campaigns/caregiver/caregiver.html

http://www.aarp.org/home-family/caregiving/?cmp=RDRCT-CRGNG_APR12_012

http://www.easterseals.com/explore-resources/for-caregivers/understanding-aging-and-caregiving.html

Footnotes:

[1] http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/a-dozen-things-you-should-never-say-to-a-caregiver_us_5621409fe4b08589ef474317

[2] http://caregiveraction.org/national-family-caregivers-month-theme/

Simplesa® is now offering the Deanna Protocol® and Lunasin to ALS Patients

Simplesa, a nutrition company established in 2013 after the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) community showed its support for a metabolic supplement treatment called the Deanna Protocol (DP), has expanded its products for the Deanna Protocol with the addition of LunaCell™ for consumers.

Patients with ALS (PALS) have been following the Deanna Protocol (DP) since it was first released in 2011. The Deanna Protocol is an all-natural metabolic program developed by Dr. Vincent Tedone, a retired physician whose daughter, Deanna, was diagnosed with ALS. The Deanna Protocol works to support mitochondria dysfunction with energy production and the counteracting oxidative stress. The Deanna Protocol (DP) helps improve the quality of life for people with ALS. Patients who consistently follow the plan have reported an improvement in energy production, reduction in muscle twitching and cramping, and improved coordination, balance, and limberness.

lunacellLunasin first caught the attention of physicians and the ALS community when Mike McDuff, who was diagnosed with ALS, took the nutrient in 2012 and had a remarkable recovery. Therefore, Lunasin, a soy peptide that may alter histone acetylation, has been associated with ALS reversal.[1] Lunasin was the first dietary compound with an identified epigenetic mechanism of action.  PALS often have elevated levels of free radicals. Lunasin is significant to the ALS population as multiple studies show Lunasin helps reduce free radical production while also scavenging free radicals.    Since that time, Lunasin has caught the attention of many trying to cure and/or treat ALS.  Among those interested in Lunasin and ALS is Dr. Richard Bedlack, Director of the ALS Clinic at Duke University. He started the first of its kind study on Lunasin with reporting conducted through a patient network and real-time research platform called Patients Like Me.

As with the Deanna Protocol, Simplesa saw the potential to help PALS with Lunasin.  Simplesa® recently released its Lunasin product, LunaCell™, which consists of a superior bioavailable form of Lunasin and is priced relatively lower than other Lunasin products. This formulation allows patients to take less capsules and quickly absorb more Lunasin into their system.

Feedback from verified consumers of the products has been very positive:

It seems impossible but after two days my dad muscle movement on leg that is useless for more than a year. – Andrej

 

I only take half of the capsules and it costs half as much as other Lunasin I took. Thank you. – Pedro O.

Simplesa® has always been committed to meeting the unmet needs of its consumers, and they quickly saw the benefit to PALS to provide more options with the Deanna Protocol® products and LunaCell™. This new program is opening doors for additional choices for PALS to try both complimentary regimes and improve their quality of life.

Sources:

  1. Oxidative Stress and Radivcava: 

https://alsnewstoday.com/2017/08/03/nine-things-to-know-about-the-new-als-drug-radicava/

  1. Oxidative Stress and Lunasin:

https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/3616328.pdf

  1. Oxidative Stress and Deanna protocol: 

http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0103526

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/272828777_ALS_Untangled_No_20_the_Deanna_protocol

[1]www.mndassociation.org%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2FFINAL-WIP-booklet-Dublin-081116.docx&usg=AOvVaw0QgHpgvjCAB2Dae8-77Ins

The Science Behind Lunasin and Its Benefits

Lunasin has been getting a lot of press, research and attention for benefiting a variety of health conditions. It is important to understand the science behind Lunasin, and how it can help your body.

Lunasin is natural, and found in soy, barley, and rye.  It is a 43-amino acid polypeptide with poly (L-aspartic acid) sequence at the carboxyl terminus.

Proteins and peptides are fundamental components of cells that carry out important biological functions. Proteins give cells their shape, for example, and they respond to signals transmitted from the extracellular environment. Certain types of peptides play key roles in regulating the activities of other molecules. Structurally, proteins and peptides are very similar, being made up of chains of amino acids that are held together by peptide bonds (also called amide bonds).

So, what distinguishes a peptide from a protein?

The basic distinguishing factors are size and structure. Peptides are smaller than proteins. Traditionally, peptides are defined as molecules that consist of between 2 and 50 amino acids, whereas proteins are made up of 50 or more amino acids. In addition, peptides tend to be less well defined in structure than proteins, which can adopt complex conformations known as secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structures. [1]

Lunasin is a “bioactive” peptide which means it is a compound that influences living things and their core elements – like tissue and cells. Bioactive compounds have been shown via research and studies to have an influence on health. Areas of Lunasin research have focused on cancer, cholesterol, cardiovascular, inflammation, skin health and anti-aging.  Let’s examine these studies and how the science supports the benefits of Lunasin on your health and well-being.

Cancer

For over a decade research has shown “Lunasin as a cancer-preventive soy peptide.”[2] Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center indicated that:

Studies in animals suggest that soy can prevent or reduce bone loss. In laboratory studies, iso- flavones slowed down the growth of several different types of cancer cells, including breast and prostate cancers. Animal studies showed that genistein, one of the isoflavones, may interfere with tamoxifen that is used for breast cancer. But a new study showed that soy foods can benefit women with breast cancer. Patients should consult their physicians about use of soy supplements.[3]

Skin Health

In 2017 a study stated that “The soy-derived peptide Lunasin inhibits invasive potential of melanoma initiating cells” and concluded that “Our studies suggest that Lunasin represents a unique anticancer agent that could be developed to help prevent metastasis and patient relapse by reducing the activity of CICs which are known to be resistant to current chemotherapies.”[4]

Cholesterol & Cardiovascular Health

The 2016 study “Identification of Lunasin as the Active Component in Soy Protein Responsible for Reducing LDL Cholesterol and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease” published by American Heart Association, Inc. found that:

Soy protein has an approved FDA health claim for reducing LDL cholesterol and CVD risk but the active component and mechanism of action are unknown. They tested the hypothesis that the lunasin peptide is the active component in soy protein responsible for lowering LDL cholesterol.

Using a lunasin bioactivity assay, we were able to produce a lunasin-enriched soy extract (LSE) containing 100-200-fold more bioactive lunasin than soy protein isolates. To test the in vivo efficacy of LSE, we conducted a food supplementation experiment on five pigs that have high LDL cholesterol due to mutations in their LDL receptor genes. The pigs were fed casein-based diets and after two weeks their casein diet was supplemented with 250 mg LSE every day for eight weeks. Blood draws and lipid panel testing were done at -2w (before casein diet), 0w (2 weeks casein), 4w (4w casein + 250 mg LES) and 8w (8w casein + 250 mg LES). Results showed that casein diet increased LDL cholesterol levels in the LDL-R mutant pigs by an average of 6.7%. The addition of 250 mg of LES in case in diet reduced LDL cholesterol by 8.6% and 6.4% after 4 and 8 weeks of treatment, respectively. These results prove that lunasin is the active nutrient in soy protein responsible for LDL cholesterol lowering and its mechanism of action is by reducing cholesterol biosynthesis in the liver.[5]

Inflammation

Inflammation has an impact on all areas of health and well-being.

Inflammation is part of the host defense mechanism against harmful matters and injury; however, aberrant inflammation is associated to the development of chronic diseases such as cancer. Lunasin is a novel peptide that demonstrates potential anticancer activity against mammalian cancer cell lines and may play a role in inflammation. In conclusion, lunasin and lunasin-like peptides purified from defatted soybean flour inhibited inflammation in LPS-induced.[6]

Although inflammation is linked in the public mind with chronic health problems such as heart disease, diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis, de Mejia said it also plays a role in the development of cancer. “We know that chronic inflammation is associated with an increased risk of malignancies, that it’s a critical factor in tumor progression,” she said. “And we can see that daily consumption of lunasin-rich soy protein may help to reduce chronic inflammation.[7]

Obesity

A study in 2017 examined the relationship between inflammation and obesity. The study was called “Lunasin attenuates obesity-related inflammation in RAW264.7 cells and 3T3-L1 adipocytes by inhibiting inflammatory cytokine production”.

This study indicated that lunasin is not only effective against inflammatory response of RAW264.7 macrophages, but also highlights this suppressive property on 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and disrupts the crosstalk between macrophages and adipocytes, particularly by inhibiting secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators, might benefit to ameliorate obesity-induced inflammatory diseases.[8]

Anti-Aging

Lunasin has been shown to help with anti-aging. Epigenetics shows the relationship of Lunasin to aging. Epigenetics is the study of long-term changes in chromosomes that don’t involve alterations in the genetic code.

But perhaps the most exciting area of aging epigenetics is the recent notion of an epigenetic clock, called Horvath’s clock, after its discoverer. The gist of it is that there is a strong association between the amount of genome-wide methylation and mortality. A lot of the genome is methylated when we are young but methylation is reduced in a constant clock-like way as we age. Methylation, recall, tends to silence genes. With age, it appears, an increasing number of genes that should be silenced are not, rendering us more susceptible to all manner of ailments. From reading the amount of methylation in the epigenome, scientists can predict an individual’s age with impressive accuracy.[9]

If you can utilize Lunasin to regulate or reset epigenetic implications of aging, then some studies believe we can reverse it.  One such study, examined this aspect of utilizing Lunasin for anti-aging. “Histone Modifications and Epigenetic Regulation Could Hold the Key to Reversing Aging” found that:

Results from a recent study conducted by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania show that yeast could help advance our progress in extending life in human cells. The team of researchers included Shelley Berger, PhD, professor in Cell & Developmental Biology and Biology & Genetics departments at the Perelman School of Medicine, Weiwei Dang, PhD, assistant professor at Baylor College of Medicine and former postdoc fellow at Penn, and Payel Sen, PhD, a current postdoc fellow in Berger’s lab. The study was published in Genes & Development and focused on how a certain epigenetic histone modification could extend yeast’s lifespan.

“Researchers have just started to appreciate how these epigenetic histone modifications may be playing essential roles in determining lifespan,” said Berger. She has conducted studies on epigenetic marks for more than 20 years and was one of the first to identify histone modifications that are altered during aging and directly impact longevity.

Dang explained that their study pinpointed a type of abnormal transcription that is significantly increased in older cells and, if reduced, can lengthen lifespan in yeast. He started the research when he was working in Berger’s lab.

He explained that “this longevity effect is mediated through an evolutionarily conserved chemical modification on histones [and] this is the first demonstration that such a mechanism exists to regulate aging.”

Although measuring aging in yeast is quite different from measuring human aging, Sen noted that using a budding yeast single-cell organism model turned out to be surprisingly powerful in their study of aging and epigenetic regulation.[10]

The research, science and benefits of Lunasin are clearly seen in these and many other scientific studies.

lunacell

 

 

Simplesa LunaCell™ is the most advanced Lunasin supplement on the market today. LunaCell has more than twice the concentration of bioavailable Lunasin than any other product available.  If you understand the science, then the choice is clear – choose LunaCell™!!

 

 

 

[1] https://www.britannica.com/demystified/what-is-the-difference-between-a-peptide-and-a-protein

[2] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15730231

[3] https://www.mskcc.org/cancer-care/integrative-medicine/herbs/soy

[4] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28424421

[5] http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/126/Suppl_21/A10693

[6] http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0196978109003416

[7] https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091202153946.htm

[8] http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0171969

[9] http://goop.com/understanding-epigenetics-and-what-it-means-for-aging-cancer-and-obesity/

[10] https://www.whatisepigenetics.com/histone-modifications-and-epigenetic-regulation-could-hold-the-key-to-reversing-aging/

Metabolics and ALS

We often hear that we are what we eat.  Most people know how important it is to eat balanced healthy foods to stay healthy, but the importance of diet and nutrients is increased when you are ill. Often the symptoms or side effects of the disease are impaired metabolic function. Even eating a healthy diet won’t completely rectify this concern. Chronically ill patients sometimes can’t obtain the nutrients they require and/or the metabolizing process of nutrients has broken down. This breakdown impacts other critically important bodily functions.

Basics of Nutrition and Metabolism

Figure 1 – https://prezi.com/j5mbaoirevn1/copy-of-nutrition-vs-metabolism/#

In the recent article from National Institute of Health in November 2016 researchers found in the study “Metabolic Biomarkers and Neurodegeneration: A Pathway Enrichment Analysis of Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis”:

Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) lack robust diagnostics and prognostic biomarkers. Metabolomics is a postgenomics field that offers fresh insights for biomarkers of common complex as well as rare diseases. Using data on metabolite-disease associations published in the previous decade (2006-2016) in PubMed, ScienceDirect, Scopus, and Web of Science, we identified 101 metabolites as putative biomarkers for these three neurodegenerative diseases. Notably, uric acid, choline, creatine, L-glutamine, alanine, creatinine, and N-acetyl-L-aspartate were the shared metabolite signatures among the three diseases. The disease-metabolite-pathway associations pointed out the importance of membrane transport (through ATP binding cassette transporters), particularly of arginine and proline amino acids in all three neurodegenerative diseases. When disease-specific and common metabolic pathways were queried by using the pathway enrichment analyses, we found that alanine, aspartate, glutamate, and purine metabolism might act as alternative pathways to overcome inadequate glucose supply and energy crisis in neurodegeneration. These observations underscore the importance of metabolite-based biomarker research in deciphering the elusive pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases. Future research investments in metabolomics of complex diseases might provide new insights on AD, PD, and ALS that continue to place a significant burden on global health.[1]

A year earlier, another study published in JAMA, October 2015, “Association Between Dietary Intake and Function in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis” concluded:

 that Antioxidants, carotenes, fruits, and vegetables were associated with higher ALS function at baseline by regression of nutrient indices and weighted quantile sum regression analysis. We also demonstrated the usefulness of the weighted quantile sum regression method in the evaluation of diet. Those responsible for nutritional care of the patient with ALS should consider promoting fruit and vegetable intake since they are high in antioxidants and carotenes.[2]

Nutrition is especially important for ALS patients, and following the Deanna Protocol™ “supercharges” the right nutrition for patients with ALS (PALS). It also aids as a metabolic therapy and supports energy metabolism. A study published in 2014 by the National Institute of Health investigated and found that the Deanna Protocol® (DP):

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a neurodegenerative disorder of motor neurons causing progressive muscle weakness, paralysis, and eventual death from respiratory failure. There is currently no cure or effective treatment for ALS. Besides motor neuron degeneration, ALS is associated with impaired energy metabolism, which is pathophysiologically linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and glutamate excitotoxicity. The Deanna Protocol (DP) is a metabolic therapy that has been reported to alleviate symptoms in patients with ALS. In this study we hypothesized that alternative fuels in the form of TCA cycle intermediates, specifically arginine-alpha-ketoglutarate (AAKG), the main ingredient of the DP, and the ketogenic diet (KD), would increase motor function and survival in a mouse model of ALS (SOD1-G93A). ALS mice were fed standard rodent diet (SD), KD, or either diets containing a metabolic therapy of the primary ingredients of the DP consisting of AAKG, gamma-aminobutyric acid, Coenzyme Q10, and medium chain triglyceride high in caprylic triglyceride. Assessment of ALS-like pathology was performed using a pre-defined criteria for neurological score, accelerated rotarod test, paw grip endurance test, and grip strength test. Blood glucose, blood beta-hydroxybutyrate, and body weight were also monitored. SD+DP-fed mice exhibited improved neurological score from age 116 to 136 days compared to control mice. KD-fed mice exhibited better motor performance on all motor function tests at 15 and 16 weeks of age compared to controls. SD+DP and KD+DP therapies significantly extended survival time of SOD1-G93A mice by 7.5% (p = 0.001) and 4.2% (p = 0.006), respectively. Sixty-three percent of mice in the KD+DP and 72.7% of the SD+DP group lived past 125 days, while only 9% of the control animals survived past that point. Targeting energy metabolism with metabolic therapy produces a therapeutic effect in ALS mice which may prolong survival and quality of life in ALS patients.[3]

One thing shown over and over via these studies and anecdotal reports from PALS is that the Deanna Protocol® Metabolic Therapy is helping many PALS with quality of Life.

New studies are underway. the scientists at University of South Florida (USF) are moving forward with the experiment to determine the efficacy of the Deanna Protocol® Plan when combined with glutamic oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT). [4]

The DP® Plan focuses on cell metabolism. It delivers Alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG) to the Krebs Cycle in the neurons. The increase in AKG enables their mitochondria to produce enough energy to keep cells alive, despite their exposure to an unhealthy amount of extracellular glutamate.  AKG usually does not pass through the cell membranes in normal healthy cells.  Based on our experience, we found that the permeability of the cell membrane in diseased or damaged cells changes and allows AKG to permeate the cells. Due to the fact that AKG only enters diseased cells, the substance only goes where it is needed.

If you need more information on how Simplesa® Deanna Metabolic Plan can help you, please contact us for assistance.

Footnotes:

[1] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27828769

[2] http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaneurology/fullarticle/2570546

[3] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25061944

[4] https://www.winningthefight.org/latest-developments

Caregivers – “Take Care to Give Care”

 caregivingCaregiving – It’s one of the hardest, physically and emotionally draining roles anyone can undertake.  In a 2015 survey from AARP and the National Alliance of Caregiving it was found that a third of all Americans are caregivers, providing care to someone who is disabled, ill or elderly.  The same study found that almost 80% of these caregivers stated they needed help.[1] Caregivers can be family members or friends. Many caregivers have jobs, families, and the additional responsibility of the minute to minute needs of the person to whom they are providing care 24/7.  It is not just driving to doctor visits or making meals. Many caregivers are providing nursing care (maintaining Stomas, catheters, or feeding tubes), often without the training or previous experience to do so. Caregivers learn quickly as the lives and well-being of someone they love relies on them. Perhaps the person being cared for is not a good patient, or does not remember you, or has tremendous guilt in being ill or helpless. These are all potential circumstances that many caregivers have to face every day. It’s one of the experiences in life that unless you have done it – you won’t quite understand the demands or the challenges.

Tips for Caregiver:

The first rule of taking care of others: take care of yourself first. Caregiving can be a rewarding experience, but it is also physically and emotionally demanding. The stress of dealing with caregiving responsibilities leads to a higher risk of health issues among the nation’s 90 million family caregivers. So as a family caregiver, remember to pay attention to your own physical and mental wellness, and get proper rest and nutrition. Only by taking care of yourself can you be strong enough to take care of your loved one. You really do need to “take care to give care!”

  • Caregiving can be a stressful job. Most family caregivers say they feel stressed providing care for a loved one. With all of their caregiving responsibilities – from managing medications to arranging doctor appointments to planning meals – caregivers too often put themselves last.
  • The stress of caregiving impacts your own health. One out of five caregivers admit they have sacrificed their own physical health while caring for a loved one. Due to stress, caregivers have a disproportionate number of health and emotional problems. They are twice as likely to suffer depression and are at increased risk for many other chronic conditions.
  • Proper nutrition helps promote good health. Ensuring that you are getting proper nutrition is key to help maintain your strength, energy and stamina, as well as strengthening your immune system. Maintaining a healthy diet is one of the most powerful things you can do to take care of yourself and keep a positive attitude overall.
  • Ensuring good nutrition for your loved one helps make care easier. As many as half of all older adults are at risk for malnutrition. Good nutrition can help maintain muscle health, support recovery, and reduce risk for re-hospitalization – which may help make your care of a loved one easier.
  • Remember: “Rest. Recharge. Respite.” People think of respite as a luxury, but considering caregivers’ higher risk for health issues from chronic stress, those risks can be a lot costlier than some time away to recharge. The chance to take a breather, the opportunity to re-energize, is vital in order for you to be as good a caregiver tomorrow as you were today.[2]

What is Respite?

According to the Lifespan Respite Care Act (PL 109-442), Lifespan Respite is defined as ‘coordinated systems of community-based respite for family caregivers of children or adults regardless of special need.’  For more information, on Respite please visit: https://archrespite.org/index.php

Tips for Others:

As a caregiver your world at times feels like it’s in chaos and out of your control.  Interacting with other people can often be tiresome and difficult as you simply feel too overwhelmed to participate in social settings. Other people often want to help and support you, but struggle with what they can say and do to help.  We have compiled some great suggestions for what to say or not to say to caregivers.  Please feel free to send suggestions we have not mentioned in this blog. Interesting enough, there is some overlap on the advice on what best to say or not to say to caregivers. Bottom line:  speak from the heart and be supportive of their needs.

12 Things You Should Say to a Family Caregiver By Becky Benishek

Keep in mind many caregivers won’t ask for help, so the best way to help someone is to do things for them that they may not have the time, money, or mental energy to do for themselves. Social settings and activities may at times be too draining, or the fear of being a “bummer” or not in “the best mood” can often cause many caregivers to go into recluse mode.

A Dozen Things You Should Never Say to A Caregiver by Ann Brenoff

There is assistance and resources to help caregivers.  Many times a caregiver is so consumed in the day to day tasks of caregiving they don’t have the bandwidth to research tools or support.  One such resource is geared to caregivers of Veterans.  Per the Veteran Benefits: Caregiver Programs and Services on Military.com website:

On May 5, 2010, the Caregivers and Veterans Omnibus Health Services Act of 2010 was signed into law. Title I of the Act will allow VA to provide unprecedented benefits to eligible Caregivers (a parent, spouse, child, step-family member, extended family member, or an individual who lives with the Veteran, but is not a family member) who support the Veterans who have given so much for this Nation. The law distinguishes between Veterans who incurred or aggravated a serious injury in the line of duty on or after Sept. 11, 2001 (post-9/11 Veterans), and those Veterans whose injuries were incurred prior to Sept. 11, 2001 (pre-9/11 Veterans).

Please visit the VA’s caregiver page for more information, and to apply for these services.

 Caregivers Toolbox:

http://caregiveraction.org/family-caregiver-toolbox

http://www.caregiving.org/resources/

http://www.rosalynncarter.org/caregiver_resources/

https://www.medicare.gov/campaigns/caregiver/caregiver.html

http://www.aarp.org/home-family/caregiving/?cmp=RDRCT-CRGNG_APR12_012

http://www.easterseals.com/explore-resources/for-caregivers/understanding-aging-and-caregiving.html

Footnotes:

[1] http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/a-dozen-things-you-should-never-say-to-a-caregiver_us_5621409fe4b08589ef474317

[2] http://caregiveraction.org/national-family-caregivers-month-theme/

Metabolic Support and ALS

As children we grew up with our parents and teachers telling us how important eating well was to our health.  Our bodies are delicately balanced between nutrition and energy. When we are ill, our body often requires additional energy or that metabolic relationship may become damaged.  Some diseases or their symptoms can cause or contribute to the metabolic imbalance.  In ALS, as the disease progresses, this imbalance can lead to “malnutrition, common with progression of disease, muscle strength and breathing capacity due to weakening as well as increase the relative risk of death.”[1]

A recent study was released in June 2016 which examined the relationship between nutrition status and the progression of ALS.  The study was “Association between estimated total daily energy expenditure and stage of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in ALS patients” and it wanted to “investigate the relationship between total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) and progression of disease in ALS patients and sex differences in TDEE.”[2]   The highlights of the study were:

●Total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) decreased with progression of ALS.
●Energy intake of ALS patients was not sufficient as compared with TDEE.
●Nutrition support should be started before stage 3 of ALS.

370 ALS patients’ TDEE were evaluated and followed in regard to resting energy expenditure (REE) and physical activity.  The results were that the TDEE decreased as the ALS progressed.  The study suggests:

that TDEE decreases with progression of ALS, and patients consume insufficient energy compared with required intake at all stages, particularly at stage 3, suggesting that nutrition support should be started at least prior to stage 3. Additionally, among the five equations for TDEE, TDEE 2 could be the best for evaluating the nutritional status of ALS patients.[3]

Previous studies and articles have examined the relationship between energy intake (nutrition) and ALS before.  In 2014 the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition released the article “Estimating daily energy expenditure in individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.”  Patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) experience progressive limb weakness, muscle atrophy, and dysphagia, making them vulnerable to insufficient energy intake. [4]

As with any chronic illness, nutritional support is critical.  The challenge is that the physical symptoms of ALS make energy intake difficult. Proactive and ongoing nutritional support and metabolic balance is important in the overall progression and well-being of the patient.

The study published online “Hypercaloric enteral nutrition in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial” emphasizes the need for a dietary and/or nutritional intervention to offset the metabolic dysfunction PALS experience.

In summary, we believe that our study results provide preliminary evidence for a novel, simple, low-cost, low-risk treatment for this devastating disease. The results of this study also support growing interest in the use of dietary interventions to treat neurological diseases. Our results also support the concept that ALS is a multi-organ systemic disease, characterized by metabolic dysfunction.3   We believe that given the promising results of this pilot study and lack of treatment options for ALS, nutritional interventions should be studied in larger randomized controlled trials at earlier stages of the disease.[5]

Simplesa® offers the metabolic plan called the Deanna Protocol for PALS.  This protocol has been found by many ALS patients to help quality of life and slow progression of the disease.  Additionally, other nutritional supplements are available to offset the metabolic balance and gain or maintain weight in PALS or others with health concerns where adequate nutritional intake is compromised or inadequate.

[1] http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0004-282X2014000200157

[2] http://www.nutritionjrnl.com/article/S0899-9007(16)30096-X/fulltext

[3] http://www.nutritionjrnl.com/article/S0899-9007(16)30096-X/fulltext

[4]https://www.researchgate.net/publication/262046313_Estimating_daily_energy_expenditure_in_individuals_with_amyotrophic_lateral_sclerosis

[5] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4176708/

31 FACTS FOR ALS AWARENESS MONTH

31 FACTS FOR ALS AWARENESS MONTH

Guest Post by Sarah Martin

Fact #1: ALS is a disease of the nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord.

Fact #2: ALS is also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, named after Yankees player Lou Gehrig.

Fact #3: Most people with ALS live 2-5 years after the first signs of the disease. About 10% live for ≥10 years.

Fact #4: Every 90 minutes someone is diagnosed with ALS in the United States.

Fact #5: Early signs of ALS include muscle weakness, twitching, muscle cramps & difficulty speaking or swallowing.

Fact #6: ALS occurs throughout the world and has no socioeconomic, ethnic, or racial boundaries.

Fact #7: There is no single diagnostic test for ALS. Diagnosis is based on symptoms and ruling out other diseases.

Fact #8: The cause of ALS is not known.

Fact #9: ALS does not affect a person’s ability to smell, see, taste, hear, or recognize touch.

Fact #10: French neurologist Jean-Martin Charcot discovered ALS in 1869, yet we still have no cure for the disease.

Fact #11: Tests done to diagnose ALS can include electromyography, blood & urine tests, spinal tap & muscle biopsy.

Fact #12: About 5-10% of ALS cases are inherited, also known as familial ALS. It is caused by a genetic mutation.

Fact #13: Most ALS cases are sporadic. It can affect anyone.

Fact #14: US military veterans are approximately twice as likely to develop ALS.

Fact #15: ALS is not contagious.

Fact #16: ALS usually strikes between the ages of 40-70, but can occur in younger adults and the elderly.

Fact #17: ALS is slightly more common in men than women.

Fact #18: ALS = MND (Motor Neuron Disease) in some parts of the world such as the UK and Australia.

Fact #19: A small percentage of people with ALS experience frontotemporal dementia (FTD).

Fact #20: ALS generally spreads from one part of the body to another.

Fact #21: Some public figures with ALS include former NFL player Steve Gleason and physicist Stephen Hawking.

Fact #22: ALS stands for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

Fact #23: Involuntary muscles are not affected in ALS. These include the muscles that control the bladder and heartbeat.

Fact #24: It is estimated that approximately 30,000 people in the United States may be living with ALS at the current time.

Fact #25: Current treatment for ALS focuses on managing symptoms and improving quality of life.

Fact #26: It is essential that people with ALS receive psychological and social support in addition to physical support.

Fact #27: People with ALS work with a multidisciplinary team of doctors to manage symptoms and improve quality of life.

Fact #28: In 2014, the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge raised millions of dollars for research, patient care and more.

Fact #29: There are organizations & people around the world working hard for a cure for ALS, including ALSA & ALS TDI.

Fact #30: The month of May has been established as ALS Awareness Month in the United States.

Fact #31: We will put an end to ALS one day.

Deanna Protocol – Nutritional/Metabolic Protocol for People with ALS

The Deanna Protocol: Help with ALS

A diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) may leave you feeling overwhelmed, scared, angry, depressed and confused. But there is hope and help with the Deanna Protocol®.

ALS

ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder for which there is no cure. In ALS, nerve cells that control your muscles degenerate and die, leading to loss of function, including the ability to move, eat, speak and breathe. Life expectancy following a diagnosis is two to five years.

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that ALS affects about 1.6 people per 100,000 population in the United States and that about 5,000 people are diagnosed with ALS each year. Researchers have found that in patients with ALS:

  • Nerve cells lose energy
  • Without energy the nerve cells die
  • Glutamate, a neurotransmitter (a chemical that sends messages from nerve cells to muscle cells) byproduct of cell metabolism, is present in excessive amounts

These findings led to the development of the Deanna Protocol.

The Deanna Protocol

In 2009, Dr. Vincent Tedone, a retired orthopedic surgeon, was motivated to research alternative ALS therapies when his 30-year-old daughter, Deanna, was diagnosed with the disease. He wondered if ALS could be treated similarly to diabetes, a disease in which the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas produce little or no insulin, causing high glucose levels in the blood that can damage the heart, kidneys and other organs and systems. Diabetes treatment consists of replacing the missing insulin. Dr. Tedone theorized that replacing the missing metabolic enzymes that provide cells with energy would slow ALS progression.

As a result, Dr. Tedone put together the Deanna Protocol, a metabolic therapy, that has been shown to improve muscle function, reduce symptoms and increase longevity in mice with ALS. Although no human clinical trials have been conducted at this time, patient testimonials about reduced symptoms, improved functioning and better quality of life support these findings.

The Deanna Protocol consists of:

  1. Daily intake of naturally occurring metabolic supplements to supply energy to the cells and antioxidants
  2. Massage with extra virgin coconut oil
  3. Nonexhaustive exercise, including resistance training and aerobics

For more information about the Deanna Protocol, visit Winning the Fight or Simplesa®, a nutritional supplement company.

Simplesa®

Simplesa® is a nutritional supplement company that has developed formulations based on the Deanna Protocol. Simplesa products are the first-ever specific vitamins and supplements for ALS patients, making it easy and affordable to follow the Deanna Protocol. For more information, visit Simplesa.

Additional Support and Resources

Additional help is available from the ALS Association. This national nonprofit organization is dedicated to researching a cure for ALS and providing resources and assistance to ALS patients and their families. Visit their website to find educational materials for both patients and caregivers and for access to local programs and services that can help you cope with ALS.

Deanna Protocol Bundles – New Year, New Options, Lower Pricing

Deanna Protocol
Deanna Protocol Comprehensive Bundle

 

Each New Year provides new opportunities to grow and help expand our efforts to our customers.  The last year saw heightened attention and popularity of the Deanna Protocol.

A Recap of the Deanna Protocol®

The Deanna Protocol® is an all-natural metabolic program developed by Dr. Vincent Tedone through his extensive research on Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig’s Disease). Scientific studies conducted on the Deanna Protocol® by Winning the Fight have shown that it benefits individuals with ALS.

Simplesa offers several choices for the Deanna Protocol®

Simplesa® understands your struggle with ALS as well as the expense and financial burden for many who want to follow the protocol. The popularity of the Deanna Protocol has enabled us to lower our costs and pass those savings on to you. We’ve reduced the price of the Deanna Protocol Bundle Packs.  The additional bundle choices include preferences for powders, capsules or liquids in the bundles.  Our goal is to make following the Deanna Protocol as simple and cost effective as possible for you!

The one thing that has not changed is that you will still get the same quality products and service you’ve always received from Simplesa!

What are the changes in the bundles for following the Deanna Protocol?

Simplesa has created new bundle packs for those choosing not to follow the full Deanna Protocol Comprehensive Approach, but instead follow core approaches.

We now offer a more varied and flexible approach with more choices for you:

1.     “CORE” Bundles contain the DP Plan Essentials;

2.     “Plus” Bundles which add Liposomal Glutathione to the Core Bundles;

3.     “Comprehensive” Bundles for an all-inclusive approach.

What are the differences between the three options?

1.     The “CORE” Bundles contain all of the DP™ Plan Essentials nutrients: AAKG, AKG, Ubiquinol, GABA, Niacin and 5-HTP. 

a.     You will see two options for the CORE Bundles

i.     “CORE” Bundle 1 – includes AKG+ Capsules

ii.     “CORE” Bundle 2 – includes AKG Liquids

1.     The difference between the two “CORE” Bundles are the choice of AKG+ Capsules or AKG Liquids

2.      The “PLUS” Bundles contain all of the DP™ Plan Essentials nutrients plus Liposomal Glutathione, considered the best antioxidant for the central nervous system.

a.     You will see two options for the “PLUS” Bundles

i.     You get the “Core” Bundle 1 plus you get Liposomal Glutathione

ii.     You get the “CORE” Bundle 2 plus you get Liposomal Glutathione

 

3.     The “COMPREHENSIVE” Bundles contain all of the DP™ Plan Essentials nutrients plus Liposomal Glutathione and the AM & PM Blends. Liposomal Glutathione is considered the best antioxidant for the central nervous system. The AM & PM Blends contain 20 nutrients that support muscle and nerve health based on research from the NIH.  All are included in the Winning the Fight Program for ALS.

a.     The “COMPREHENSIVE” BUNDLES give you 4 choices

i.     “COMPREHENSIVE” Bundle 1  or Bundle 2 include a choice of “CORE” 1 or 2 Bundle plus Liposomal Glutathione and AM & PM Powder Blends

1.     The difference is the choice of AKG+ Capsules or AKG Liquids combined with the AM & PM Powder Blends

ii.     “COMPREHENSIVE” Bundle 3  or Bundle 4 include the  “CORE” 1 or 2 Bundle plus Liposomal Glutathione and AM & PM Liquid Blends

1.     The difference is the choice of AKG+ Capsules or AKG Liquids combined with the AM & PM Liquid Blends

 

How will these changes in Simplesa® Bundles help me?

You now have more choices on how you can follow the Deanna Protocol and at lower prices.

Please click here to explore the new choices and savings on Simplesa® Deanna Protocol Bundles. If you have questions or need help please contact – we are here to help.

Support your Bones

Support your Bones

Our bones are the foundation of our body. If our framework is weak, we will fall, figuratively and literally.  Because we don’t see them, the health of our bones are often overlooked until we have a problem.

When you think about fitness, do you consider the condition of your bones?

Did you know that bones are actually living and growing tissue? Like any other living thing, if not given the proper nutrition your bones will suffer. Even with proper diet and exercise, age and disease can result in bone loss for men and women. During and after menopause many women will see a sharp decline in estrogen. This drop can result in significant loss of bone density. The National Osteoporosis Association describes some of the bone concerns for women and why:

Being female puts you at risk of developing osteoporosis and broken bones. Here are some facts:

  • Of the estimated 10 million Americans with osteoporosis, about eight million or 80% are women.
  • Approximately one in two women over age 50 will break a bone because of osteoporosis.
  • A woman’s risk of breaking a hip is equal to her combined risk of breast, uterine and ovarian cancer.

There are multiple reasons why women are more likely to get osteoporosis than men, including:

  • Women tend to have smaller, thinner bones than men.
  • Estrogen, a hormone in women that protects bones, decreases sharply when women reach menopause, which can cause bone loss. This is why the chance of developing osteoporosis increases as women reach menopause.[1]

Men have to be concerned with bone health and loss as well. For men it can result from testosterone, calcium, or Vitamin D deficiency. Any of these issues can arise at various times in a man’s life.

Lifestyle and diet can also cause nutritional deficiencies that result in inadequate amounts of key vitamins and nutrients required for bone health. Lack of exercise due to inactivity or illness can weaken the bones, increasing the risk of fracture. Some medical conditions can trigger a breakdown in calcium or vitamin absorption to the bones, as can some of the medications used to treat these diseases.

The National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF) indicates that the following medicines may cause bone loss:

  • Aluminum-containing antacids
  • Anti-seizure medicines (only some) such as Dilantin® or Phenobarbital
  • Aromatase inhibitors such as Arimidex®, Aromasin® and Femara®
  • Cancer chemotherapeutic drugs
  • Cyclosporine A and FK506 (Tacrolimus)
  • Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) such as Lupron® and Zoladex®
  • Heparin
  • Lithium
  • Medroxyprogesterone acetate for contraception (Depo-Provera®)
  • Methotrexate
  • Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) such as Nexium®, Prevacid® and Prilosec®
  • Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as Lexapro®, Prozac® and Zoloft®
  • Steroids (glucocorticoids) such as cortisone and prednisone
  • Tamoxifen® (premenopausal use)
  • Thiazolidinediones such as Actos® and Avandia®
  • Thyroid hormones in excess

Note: This list may not include all medicines that may cause bone loss.[2]

Bone health can be addressed with your physician through exercise and nutritional supplementation. Simplesa’s new product called OsteoGuard combines nutrients known to supply bones with the minerals they need to help strengthen the bone itself and the tissues that surround and support the bone, as well as reduce the risk of osteoporosis and bone fractures.  Additional vitamins are included to ensure that important minerals make it from the gastrointestinal tract to the bloodstream and into bone.

For more details on OsteoGuard go to: http://www.simplesanutrition.com/products/osteoguard-120-tablets.html

[1] http://nof.org/articles/235

[2] http://nof.org/articles/6

OsteoGuard_bottlelabel__51977.1423755454.600.650

Simplesa OsteoGuard™ is taken twice a day, two tablets per serving, and ideally spaced twelve hours apart for maximum absorption. Each bottle of contains 120 tablets for a 30-day supply.