Tag Archives: Alzheimers

The Fight against Neurodegenerative Diseases

The recent death of Muhammad Ali has saddened a lot of people and reinforced the urgent need to aggressively develop a cure for neurodegenerative diseases.  ALS, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and other neurodegenerative diseases have very similar characteristics regarding their causes and symptoms. They also all have no cure and are impacting too many people.

Parkinson’s disease (PD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are the second and third most common human adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases, respectively, after Alzheimer’s disease. They are characterized by prominent age-related neurodegeneration in selectively vulnerable neural systems. Some forms of PD and ALS are inherited, and genes causing these diseases have been identified. Morphological, biochemical, and genetic, as well as cell and animal model studies reveal that mitochondria could have a role in this neurodegeneration. The functions and properties of mitochondria might render subsets of selectively vulnerable neurons intrinsically susceptible to cellular aging and stress and overlying genetic variations. In PD, mutations in putative mitochondrial proteins have been identified and mitochondrial DNA mutations have been found in neurons in the substantia nigra. In ALS, changes occur in mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes and mitochondrial cell death proteins.[1]

Beyond the genetic factors to inherit these diseases, many who have had traumatic brain injury are at an increased risk of developing one of these debilitating diseases. Athletes who are involved in boxing, football and hockey, Veterans, and others are especially susceptible:

Over a lifetime, we believe that Parkinson’s and several other neurodegenerative diseases are caused by genetics AND some kind of trigger in a person’s life with age. For example, inflammation in brain tissue caused by either genetic susceptibility or triggered by accumulating cellular proteins and external events, such as severe concussions, will leave the brain more open to injury. [2]

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

ALS attacks the nerve cells located in the brain and spinal cord (motor neurons). As the disease progresses, the patient loses the ability to control muscle movement as the motor neurons die. ALS is a terminal disease currently with no cure. Metabolic treatments like the Deanna Protocol have been reported by patients to improve quality of life for those with ALS. The ALS.org shared this amazing infographic to help increase awareness and knowledge about ALS – See:  http://web.alsa.org/site/PageNavigator/Chal15_what_is_ALS.html?_ga=1.11083444.1475505218.1462481428

Parkinson’s Disease

This is a progressive and neurodegenerative disease whose cause and cure is currently unknown. Nerve cells in the brain malfunction and die.

Motor symptoms result from the loss of pigmented neurons or cells in the substantia nigra of the brain. These cells produce dopamine, a chemical responsible for smooth purposeful movement. A decrease in dopamine does not account for all symptoms experienced in PD. Research is ongoing to better understand the pathology of Parkinson’s. [3]

Alzheimer’s Disease

Despite a common misconception, Alzheimer’s is not a normal part of aging. The damage and death of nerve cells causes the symptoms most commonly associated with this disease:

  • Loss of Memory
  • Inability to carry out normal or daily activities
  • Personality changes

The brain has 100 billion nerve cells (neurons). Each nerve cell connects with many others to form communication networks. Groups of nerve cells have special jobs. Some are involved in thinking, learning and remembering. Others help us see, hear and smell.

To do their work, brain cells operate like tiny factories. They receive supplies, generate energy, construct equipment and get rid of waste. Cells also process and store information and communicate with other cells. Keeping everything running requires coordination as well as large amounts of fuel and oxygen.

Scientists believe Alzheimer’s disease prevents parts of a cell’s factory from running well. They are not sure where the trouble starts. But just like a real factory, backups and breakdowns in one system cause problems in other areas. As damage spreads, cells lose their ability to do their jobs and, eventually die, causing irreversible changes in the brain.[4]

A recent study by researchers from Indiana University, concludes that:

An enzyme that protects the brain against oxidative stress may also protect against the formation of protein clumps – a hallmark of Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and other neurodegenerative diseases. An accumulation of protein clumps is known to occur in a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) – also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. In Alzheimer’s disease, for example, studies have shown that patients often experience a build-up of a protein called tau, which clumps together in nerve cells to form “tangles.” This process – known as proteinopathy – occurs with different proteins in a variety of brain diseases and is believed to play a role in their progression.[5]

Every day someone we know or love is struggling with the challenges of a neurodegenerative disease, and many are dying. It is important to understand how these diseases are connected so we can find a cure for them all.

The Deanna Protocol® Metabolic Plan for Other Neurodegenerative Conditions

Winning the Fight ® (WFND) plans to begin researching the DP™ Plan and its effectiveness in conditions other than ALS. Why? Other neurodegenerative conditions (such as stroke, traumatic brain injury, concussion, Alzheimer ’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, Multiple Sclerosis, and more) may have different causes, but they all share one common denominator: Glutamate. Regardless of the disease/condition, all nerve cells release excess glutamate into the extracellular space when they die and this glutamate will kill neighboring cells. Therefore, nerve cell death probably spreads throughout the nervous system the same way in all of these conditions. Since the DP™ Plan manages the spread of neuron death, it could likely help manage all neurodegenerative conditions, regardless of their initial cause.

WFND has one case study showing that the DP™ Plan is extremely effective in dramatically reversing the effects of Alzheimer’s Disease, even in the advanced stages of the disease. This further encourages us to test Dr. Tedone’s hypothesis that the DP™ Plan may manage many conditions aside from ALS. They plan to conduct research testing the DP™ Plan’s effectiveness in the neurodegenerative conditions mentioned above. They also plan to test the effectiveness of the combination of the DP™ Plan and GOT in each of the aforementioned conditions above. Lastly, they aim to customize the DP™ Plan and the DP™ Plan/ GOT combination for each distinct disease.[6]

​For more information on the DP™ visit:  https://www.simplesanutrition.com/deanna-protocol/

[1] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20413846

[2] http://www.mcleanhospital.org/news/2016/06/05/fighting-parkinsons-lab

[3] http://www.apdaparkinson.org/parkinsons-disease/understanding-the-basics/

[4] http://www.alz.org/alzheimers_disease_what_is_alzheimers.asp#brain

[5] http://sourceinformer.com/index.php/2016/06/05/neurology-neuroscience-alzheimers-dementia-parkinsons-disease-muscular-dystrophy-als-brain-enzyme-could-prevent-alzheimers-neurodegenerative-disease/

[6] http://www.winningthefight.org/why-the-deanna-protocolreg-plan-works.html